2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Sociology of Gender

    The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the sociological conceptualization of gender. Through the sociological lens, gender is not an individual attribute or a role, but rather a system of social practices that constructs two different categories of people men and women and organizes social interaction and inequality around this difference. First we will explore what ¿gender¿ is according to sociologists and the current state of gender inequality in the labor market, at home, and at school. We will then investigate how gender structures our everyday lives through the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Finally, we will discuss avenues for reducing gender inequality. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research on gender."

    Course Code
    SOC 142
    Instructor(s)
    Carian, E.
    Units
    3
  • Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences

    Introduction to statistics for engineers and physical scientists. Topics: descriptive statistics, probability, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, nonparametric methods, linear regression, analysis of variance, elementary experimental design. Prerequisite: one year of calculus.

    Course Code
    STATS 110
    Instructor(s)
    Stanoyevitch, A.
    Units
    4-5
  • Theory of Probability

    Probability spaces as models for phenomena with statistical regularity. Discrete spaces (binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson). Continuous spaces (normal, exponential) and densities. Random variables, expectation, independence, conditional probability. Introduction to the laws of large numbers and central limit theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 52 and familiarity with infinite series, or equivalent.

    Course Code
    STATS 116
    Instructor(s)
    Hwang, J.
    Units
    3-5
  • Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 60)

    Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.

    Course Code
    STATS 160
    Instructor(s)
    DiCiccio, C.
    Units
    5
  • Data Mining and Analysis

    Data mining is used to discover patterns and relationships in data. Emphasis is on large complex data sets such as those in very large databases or through web mining. Topics: decision trees, association rules, clustering, case based methods, and data visualization. Prereqs: Introductory courses in statistics or probability (e.g., Stats 60), linear algebra (e.g., Math 51), and computer programming (e.g., CS 105).

    Course Code
    STATS 202
    Instructor(s)
    Patel, R.
    Units
    3
  • Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 160)

    Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.

    Course Code
    STATS 60
    Instructor(s)
    DiCiccio, C.
    Units
    5
  • Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture

    Nuclear technology has shaped our world through its various applications (e.g., weapons, energy production, medicine) and accidents and disasters (e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Fukushima). This course will examine the development of nuclear technology and its consequences to politics and culture at the global, national, regional and local levels from interdisciplinary perspectives. Some of the key questions addressed are: How did different countries and communities experience and respond to the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? How did such experiences affect the later development of the technology in different national contexts? How have nuclear tests and disasters change the ways in which risks are understood and managed globally and locally? What kinds of political activism, international arrangements, and cultural tropes and imageries emerged in response to nuclear technology? We explore these questions through key works and recent studies in history, anthropology, sociology, and science and technology studies, as well as through films and literature.

    Course Code
    STS 123
    Instructor(s)
    Sato, K.
    Units
    4
  • Working Smarter

    Once you get into the school of your dreams, how will you be sure you can succeed there? The level of organization and study skills necessary for college success are often very different than in high school settings. This class will use research-based practices to help students gain insight into effective learning strategies and approaches to time management, while honing skills in reading, studying, writing, discussion, and oral presentation. This class is appropriate for students who wish to prepare for college, as well as for those already in college who wish to revisit and expand their set of strategies for successful learning.

    Course Code
    VPTL 53
    Instructor(s)
    Crosby, J., Randazzo, T.
    Units
    2
  • Exploring Happiness

    Explores how research-based happiness theory and principles are applied to enhance daily and life satisfaction. Positions happiness as a cornerstone construct of personal wellness, purpose, and fulfillment. Investigates the science of happiness through lecture, guided practice, dialogue, and course material in order to enhance understanding and implementation.

    Course Code
    WELLNESS 211
    Instructor(s)
    Luskin, F.
    Units
    1
  • Meditation

    Introduces diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Practices in guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, mindfulness, and mantra meditation will be offered to enhance well-being. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.

    Course Code
    WELLNESS 230
    Instructor(s)
    Luskin, F.
    Units
    1

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