2016 Courses

Summer 2017 courses will be available in April.

Summer 2016 courses are available below.

  • Psychology of Women

    Women comprise half of the human population, yet throughout much of history, the study of human thought and behavior has been largely male focused. In fact, some of the earliest psychological studies of women were conducted primarily to argue for the evolutionary supremacy of men. During the past fifty years, the field of psychology has made significant strides towards considering women and men equally worthy subjects of inquiry. In this course, we will discuss this growing body of research related to gender and the female experience. We will focus on six main themes: social and biological approaches to studying gender, evidence for gender similarities and differences, gender stereotypes and sexism, gender and language use, women in the workplace, and female sexuality. We will explore these themes through lectures, in class demonstrations, analysis of empirical work, and student led discussion.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 139S
  • Bayesian Statistics for Psychologists

    Have you ever collected data and then not know how to analyze it? Bayesian data analysis is a general purpose data analysis approach for making explicit hypotheses about where the data came from (e.g. the hypothesis that data from 2 experimental conditions came from two different distributions). In this course, we will explore and learn how to use Bayesian data analytic tools for analyzing data from psychology experiments. Students will develop a strong foundation for statistical intuitions and build on these intuitions to conduct Bayesian analyses of experimental data. The course will focus on the practicalities of running Bayesian analyses, of describing analyses for purposes of publication, and of making inferences about data and design decisions for subsequent experiments. This course is ideal for graduate or advanced-undergraduate students in Psychology, Linguistics, and related fields, who conduct experiments on human behavior; also appropriate for students without experience in psychological experiments but with experience in statistics.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 201S
  • Writing Well: An Introduction to College Writing

    Offered only to participants in the Summer College for High School Students. Develops critical reading, writing, and research skills applicable to any area of study. Emphases include close reading, analysis of varied texts, development of strong theses, revision strategies, and introduction to research-based argument. Classes are small, encouraging extensive interaction between students and instructors. Discussions of readings, peer work, and individual conferences with instructors. Each section has a thematic emphasis developed by the instructor; students choose sections based on their individual interests. Does not meet the Stanford first-year writing requirement.

    Course Code
    PWR 1D
  • Who Am I? The Question of the Self in Art, Literature, Religion, and Philosophy

    This course engages the question of the self through the exploration of art, literature, religion, philosophy, and pop culture. Through close, guided readings and analysis of classic, contemporary, as well as popular materials, we will attempt to both understand and complicate the notion of the self and inquire into the personal, social, and political relationships that define its contours and boundaries. Course content will be drawn from a diverse but complementary range of thinkers including: Plato, Plotinus, Ibn al-Arabi, Jean-Paul Sartre, Martin Heidegger, William Blake, Guy Debord, Cormac McCarthy, and Friedrich Nietzsche. We will also interrogate what films such as Christopher Noland¿s Memento, images such as Manet¿s `Bar at the Folies Bergère, and countercultural musical movements such as punk rock and black metal have to add to our inquiry. Short lectures will contextualize the topics treated, but the main focus will be on fostering robust and substantive discussion and developing the philosophical skills needed to think through and debate the notion of the self and its attendant issues in a reflective and nuanced manner. By drawing from different eras and cultural contexts, we will gain a new appreciation for the historical background of the existential questions that concern us today, while confronting the radical diversity of possible responses. The seminar¿s ultimate aim is to engage with multimedia materials that help you develop, articulate, and ultimately, live out your own personal response to a very pressing question: ¿Who am I?¿

    Course Code
    RELIGST 38S
  • Sociology of Health and Illness

    This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How docontextual factors (including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities?In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine. nBy the end of the course, students will: 1) have insight into the various ways of defining and measuring health, including mortality, morbidity, physical functioning, and quality of life; 2) understand how a person¿s socio-demographic characteristics influence his or her health, including his or her ability to access resources vital to maintaining health and receiving treatment; 3) understand how researchersemploy theory and make causal inferences based on observational and experimental data; 4) comprehendhow patients and practitioners understand health and illness and their roles in the health care process; and 5) understand the role of medical care in the distribution of health outcomes across the population.

    Course Code
    SOC 105D
  • Education and Society

    This course will draw on a range of sociological theories and approaches to explore the relationship between education and society. In particular, the course will focus on themes related to the role of education in social stratification, linkages between education and the economy, polity, and culture, and the organizational contexts of schooling. More specifically, topics within these themes include: dominant sociological theories (functional, conflict, and institutional) of the functions and roles of education in society, education and its relationship to different forms of capital (human, social and cultural), educational inequalities in achievement and attainment by race, class, and gender, the role of tracking and high stakes examinations in different education systemsaround the world, and the role of globalization in shaping educational goals and policy. The content of the course will focus not only on schooling in the United States, but will draw on cross-national and historical comparisons in order to illuminate the distinctive features of different education systems and provide a broad overview of the relationship between education and society.

    Course Code
    SOC 109D
  • Comparative Corruption (POLISCI 143S)

    Causes, effects, and solutions to various forms of corruption in business and politics in both developing regions (e.g. Asia, E. Europe) and developed ones (the US and the EU).

    Course Code
    SOC 113
  • The Intuition of Social Research

    Understanding the intuition behind key statistics in social science research. The focus will be on reverse-engineering statistical tests by starting with asking what information we would need to answer questions about social life. From here, we will find that apparently complicated statistical tests are simply following the same logic necessary to reach conclusions about social life. Nearly all statistical tests start from the foundations of probability sampling, mean group differences, and variability. With these foundational concepts, students will understand the intuition behind (and similarity between) standard t-tests and the mechanics of multivariate regressions. By focusing on providing students with a firm grasp of the basic foundations of statistics, students will be better prepared to understand the purpose and logic of more complex statistical tests, which serve to answer social science¿s most interesting questions.

    Course Code
    SOC 124D
  • Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part A

    Same as SPANLANG 1. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C.

    Course Code
    SPANLANG 5A
  • Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part B

    Same as SPANLANG 2. Continuation of 5A. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 1 or 5A.

    Course Code
    SPANLANG 5B
  • Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part C

    Same as SPANLANG 3. Continuation of 5B. Continuation of 5A. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 2 or 5B. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.

    Course Code
    SPANLANG 5C
  • Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences

    Introduction to statistics for engineers and physical scientists. Topics: descriptive statistics, probability, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, nonparametric methods, linear regression, analysis of variance, elementary experimental design. Prerequisite: one year of calculus.

    Course Code
    STATS 110
  • Theory of Probability

    Probability spaces as models for phenomena with statistical regularity. Discrete spaces (binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson). Continuous spaces (normal, exponential) and densities. Random variables, expectation, independence, conditional probability. Introduction to the laws of large numbers and central limit theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 52 and familiarity with infinite series, or equivalent.

    Course Code
    STATS 116
  • Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 60)

    Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.

    Course Code
    STATS 160
  • Data Mining and Analysis

    Data mining is used to discover patterns and relationships in data. Emphasis is on large complex data sets such as those in very large databases or through web mining. Topics: decision trees, association rules, clustering, case based methods, and data visualization. Prereqs: Introductory courses in statistics or probability (e.g., Stats 60), linear algebra (e.g., Math 51), and computer programming (e.g., CS 105).

    Course Code
    STATS 202
  • Introduction to Time Series Analysis

    Time series models used in economics and engineering. Trend fitting, autoregressive and moving average models and spectral analysis, Kalman filtering, and state-space models. Seasonality, transformations, and introduction to financial time series. Prerequisite: basic course in Statistics at the level of 200.

    Course Code
    STATS 207
  • Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 160)

    Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.

    Course Code
    STATS 60
  • Science, Technology, and Environmental Justice

    The Bay Area is renowned for its technological innovations and progressive politics, including environmental justice activism. This course explores the multifaceted intersections of science, technology, and environmental issues, in the Bay Area and beyond. Throughout, students investigate the politics of place, with an eye to inequalities of race, class, gender, generation, and citizenship. Topics include: histories of environmentalism; socio-technological systems; urban and regional planning; public health and biomedicine; food systems; climate change; innovation ecosystems; undone science.

    Course Code
    STS 131
  • Acting Short Narrative: From Shakespeare to YouTube

    This course will help beginning students understand basic dramatic structure for acting short scenes. Using classic models (Euripides, Shakespeare, Noel Coward, Stephen Sondheim), we will explore how compelling dramatic scenes are constructed. Students will work with the instructor and with professional actors from Stanford Repertory Theater to come to grips with what makes these scenes successful and how best to bring them to life. As a final project, students will work together to develop and write their own short dramatic scenes, suitable for posting on YouTube.

    Course Code
    TAPS 25
  • Meditation

    Introduces diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Practices in guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, mindfulness, and mantra meditation will be offered to enhance well-being. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.

    Course Code
    WELLNESS 230

Pages