2016 Courses

Summer 2017 courses will be available in April.

Summer 2016 courses are available below.

  • Introduction to Operations Management

    Operations management focuses on the effective planning, scheduling, and control of manufacturing and service entities. This course introduces students to a broad range of key issues in operations management. Topics include determination of optimal facility location, production planning, optimal timing and sizing of capacity expansion, and inventory control. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of Excel spreadsheets, probability, and optimization.

    Course Code
    MS&E 260
  • Introduction to Decision Making

    How to ensure focus, discipline, and passion when making important decisions. Comprehensive examples illustrate Decision Analysis fundamentals. Consulting case studies highlight practical solutions for real decisions. Student teams present insights from their analyses of decisions for current organizations. Topics: declaring when and how to make a decision, framing and structuring the decision basis, defining values and preferences, creating alternative strategies, assessing unbiased probabilistic judgments, developing appropriate risk/reward and portfolio models, evaluating doable strategies across the range of uncertain future scenarios, analyzing relevant sensitivities, determining the value of additional information, and addressing the qualitative aspects of communication and commitment to implementation. Not intended for MS&E majors.

    Course Code
    MS&E 52
  • Introductory Piano Class, Level 1 (Group)

    Piano: Introductory Level 1 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 12AS
  • Introductory Piano Class, Level 2 (Group)

    Piano: Introductory Level 2 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 12BS
  • Introductory Piano Class, Level 3 (Group)

    Piano: Introductory Level 3 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 12CS
  • Summer Orchestra

    50- to 100-member ensemble performing major orchestral works. May be repeated for credit.Auditions: June 28 & 29; Rehearsal Schedule: 6/30, 7/2, 7/6, 7/7, 7/9, 7/13, 7;14, 7/16; Dress Rehearsal 7/17, 7:00-9:30PM; Performance: 7/18, 7:30PM. Email instructor with questions: mailto:awittstr@stanford.edu. Please visit http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/member-login/auditio... for information on audition requirements.nOnline sign-up available in Spring 2015! Stay tuned at the Stanford Symphony Orchestra website: http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/nBy enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 160S
  • Summer Orchestra

    50- to 100-member ensemble performing major orchestral works. May be repeated for credit.Auditions: June 28 & 29; Rehearsal Schedule: 6/30, 7/2, 7/6, 7/7, 7/9, 7/13, 7;14, 7/16; Dress Rehearsal 7/17, 7:00-9:30PM; Performance: 7/18, 7:30PM. Email instructor with questions: mailto:awittstr@stanford.edu. Please visit http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/member-login/auditio... for information on audition requirements.nOnline sign-up available in Spring 2015! Stay tuned at the Stanford Symphony Orchestra website: http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/nBy enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.nZero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 160SZ
  • Summer Chorus

    80- to 100-voice non-auditioned ensemble, performing major choral masterworks and choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Concert July 31, 2015 in Memorial Church. Details at: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-mus.... Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit for a total of 0(zero) unit. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 167S
  • Summer Chorus

    80- to 100-voice non-auditioned ensemble, performing major choral masterworks and choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Concert July 31, 2015 in Memorial Church. For details see: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-mus.... Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit for a total of 0 (zero) unit. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 167SZ
  • Voice Class 1: Beginning Voice, Level 1 (Group)

    Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 65AS
  • Voice Class 2: Beginning Voice, Level 2 (Group)

    Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 65BS
  • Intermediate Piano Class (Group)

    Piano: Intermediate Level (Group; 10 students to a section) Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 72AS
  • Public Speaking: Romancing the Room

    A practical approach to the art of public speaking. Emphasis is on developing skills in speech types including impromptu, personal experience, interviewing, demonstration, persuasive, and special occasion. Materials include videotape, texts of famous speeches, and a final dinner program of speeches. Students evaluate presentations by others. $55 materials fee. Course was previously offered as CTL 118.

    Course Code
    ORALCOMM 118
  • Swimming: Beginning II

    In this class you will learn how to relax in the water, breath effectively, float and tread, swim 3 different strokes (freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke), jump in the water from the deck, use swimming equipment (kickboards, pull buoys, fins) and swim across a 25 year pool. nIf you have fear or anxiety in the water, consider taking the ATH 128 Confidence in Water class. If you can swim across a 25 yard pool, you should take the ATH 131 Intermediate Swim class.nPrereq: non-swimmer, unable to swim across a 25 yard pool.nGoals: Learn to be safe and relaxed in shallow and deep water. Develop ease and efficiency with breathing & swimming strokes. Be safe and comfortable swimming 25 yards continuously. FEE. (AU).

    Course Code
    PE 129
  • Swimming: Intermediate

    This class is for those who can swim across a 50-yard pool. In this class you will learn how to: breathe effectively, tread water, dive in from the edge and use swimming equipment (kick boards, pull buoys, hand paddles, fins). You will be introduced to and gain further development of the 4 competitive swimming strokes (Freestyle, Backstroke, Breaststroke & Butterfly). An introduction to flipturns and intervals (50 yard repeats) will be taught. Underwater videotaping and stroke review and analysis will occur. nPrereq: Ability to swim across a 50-yard pool continuously. You MUST be comfortable in deep water, if you are uncomfortable in deep water please take ATH 129 Swimming Beginning.

    Course Code
    PE 131
  • Tennis: Beginning

    Students will learn and develop the essential stroke techniques with emphasis on control. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic play. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 144
  • Tennis: Advanced Beginning

    Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with emphasis on control, depth, and direction. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic strategy and tactics. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisites: 144, or knowledge of rules and scoring and average ability in fundamental strokes but limited playing experience. Fee. (AU)

    Course Code
    PE 145
  • Tennis: Intermediate

    Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with more emphasis on depth, direction, and spin. This course will also incorporate basic to advance strategies and tactics with performance enhancing cooperative and competitive drills. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisites:145 or average ability in fundamental strokes, and regular playing experience; NTRP rating of 3.0 -3.5 . (AU)

    Course Code
    PE 146
  • Total Body Training

    Students will learn a variety of exercises that focuses on the body as a whole. This class allows you to move, stretch and strengthen the entire body. A variety of equipment will be used to target all major muscle groups. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 151
  • Weight Training: Beginning

    This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of weight training, including equipment use, exercise technique and safety procedures. By the end of the course, students should be able to safely demonstrate a variety of exercise techniques, as well as have a general appreciation for the benefits of strength training. Fee. (AU)

    Course Code
    PE 174
  • YOGA: Beginning

    Students will be introduced to the values and skills of Hatha Yoga (Yoga of exercise). Students will learn how to reduce tension, increase energy levels, move efficiently, reconnect to self-awareness, and learn about the body. The poses and flows are adaptable and can be personalized for any level of fitness. The emphasis of the class will be on asanas (poses) and vinyasa (flow) for increased flexibility, improved health, relaxation, and reduced stress in daily living. Students will also be exposed to the language, philosophy, history, and concepts of Yoga. A typical class will include breathing techniques, meditation and asana practice, including standing, balancing, stretching and some inverted poses. At the end of the quarter students will have: (1) Acquired knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Developed physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) A positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 181
  • Yoga/Pilates Fusion

    This class will focus on practicing yoga poses and Pilates exercises to enhance one¿s sense of proprioception, mind-body awareness, and muscular strength and endurance. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 184
  • Core Training

    This course is designed to help students improve their ability to stabilize the torso. A strong core is an essential component for performance in any sport, hobby and for life. Your posture will improve enabling you to breathe more deeply. You will move with the ease and grace that comes from finding balance the fulcrum of your body. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as muscle strength and endurance (2) Develop physical fitness skills and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 23
  • Indoor Cycling

    This course is designed to teach students basic concepts associated with indoor cycling as well as build cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility through structured individually paced indoor cycling workouts. Instructors motivate participants through intervals, hill climbs and coasts for the ultimate workout. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 30
  • Golf: Beginning

    This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of the golf swing; putting, chipping, and sand play. We will also cover golf etiquette and rules. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 51
  • Golf: Advanced Beginning

    This course allows students to further development their golf swing and short game. This course will also review golf concepts, rules and etiquette. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nnPrerequisite: PE 51 or golf experience.

    Course Code
    PE 52
  • Golf: Intermediate

    This course allows students to further development their golf game by engaging in various golf drills and the opportunity to practice on all facets of golf. Students will learn how to lower scores and manage the game on the course. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisite: 52 or equivalent. Fee. (AU)

    Course Code
    PE 53
  • Essentials of Pilates

    Students will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and awareness by engaging in a variety of exercises that integrate the principles of Pilates. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. May be repeat for credit.

    Course Code
    PE 90
  • Introduction to Moral Philosophy

    Moral philosophy is the area of philosophy concerned with how we ought to live our lives. This includes questions such as: what makes an action right or wrong? what makes for a virtuous versus a vicious character? and what sort of obligations, if any, do we have to other people or animals? Our aim is to understand how influential philosophers (including Plato, Aristotle, Mill, Hume, and Kant) have answered these questions and how they have justified their positions. We will also focus on developing student skills in argument and rigorous academic writing.

    Course Code
    PHIL 20S
  • Introduction to Ancient Philosophy

    This course will focus on the philosophical thought of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. We¿ll analyze the questions they asked and the arguments they made to answer them, which are still very much alive today. In ethics, they asked questions like: what is the good life for a human being? What is a virtuous person like? Why should we want to be virtuous? Plato and Aristotle also asked questions about the foundations of ethical and scientific inquiry: when we know ethical or scientific truths, what it is that we know and how do we know it? This course will help students read complex texts, analyze arguments, and write concisely and clearly about difficult issues.

    Course Code
    PHIL 21S
  • Self, World, Freedom

    Some of philosophy¿s deepest and most persistent questions are about our place in and our interactions with the natural world. Are we ourselves part of that world, or are we somehow outside of it? How can we know about the world, if we can at all? Do we have the freedom to choose our own actions, or are our choices settled in advance? This course provides an introduction to philosophy with a special focus on these questions, which we will discuss in both historical and current forms. We will also ask after the role and value of philosophy in addressing them. What, if anything, makes philosophy a distinctive and distinctively valuable tool for their investigation?

    Course Code
    PHIL 22S
  • Law and Morality

    What makes a law just? How should a judge interpret the law? When, if ever, ought I to disobey a law? In this course, we will consider central questions in the philosophy of law concerning the relationship between morality and law. Students will gain an understanding of the history of these questions by reading classic works of literature and philosophy, including Homer, Sophocles, Plato, and Aquinas, alongside contemporary scholarship on the philosophy of law. We will also apply this theoretical background to practice as students assume the roles of judges and attorneys and consider how relevant law in actual court cases should be interpreted. Students will gain a grounding in the history of the natural law tradition, legal positivism, and legal interpretivism, as well as wrestle with problems of interpretation faced by judges today.

    Course Code
    PHIL 37S
  • Reasoning with Diagrams

    The course covers formal techniques for logical reasoning with both diagrams and sentences. The sentential part covers the same material as a standard course on first-order logic, though in less depth. It includes syntax, semantics and proof theory, but does not include any meta-theory. The diagrammatic part is novel, focusing on techniques for solving reasoning problems using diagrams and sentences in concert. We take seriously the idea that diagrams convey information in the same sense that sentences do and that it is possible to provide forma criteria for logically correct reasoning with diagrams. We use the Hyperproof courseware package which includes desktop software, an online assessment service which allows student to experiment hands-on with the material, and other online resources.

    Course Code
    PHIL 53S
  • Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

    Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 15
  • The Origin and Development of the Cosmos

    How did the present Universe come to be? The last few decades have seen remarkable progress in understanding this age-old question. Course will cover the history of the Universe from its earliest moments to the present day, and the physical laws that govern its evolution. The early Universe including inflation and the creation of matter and the elements. Recent discoveries in our understanding of the makeup of the cosmos, including dark matter and dark energy. Evolution of galaxies, clusters, and quasars, and the Universe as a whole. Implications of dark matter and dark energy for the future evolution of the cosmos. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 16
  • Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat with Laboratory

    How are the motions of objects and the behavior of fluids and gases determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and understand why objects move as they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how Newton's three laws of motion are applied to solids, liquids, and gases to describe phenomena as diverse as spinning gymnasts, blood flow, and sound waves. Understanding many-particle systems requires connecting macroscopic properties (e.g., temperature and pressure) to microscopic dynamics (collisions of particles). Laws of thermodynamics provide understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and performance limits of heat engines. Everyday examples are analyzed using tools of algebra and trigonometry. Problem-solving skills are developed, including verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer course. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry; calculus not required.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 21S
  • Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics with Laboratory

    How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Students learn to represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. The wave nature of light is used to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena. Geometric optics is employed to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. These descriptions are combined to understand the workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer courses. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or PHYSICS 21S.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 23S
  • Observational Astronomy Laboratory

    Introduction to observational astronomy emphasizing the use of optical telescopes. Observations of stars, nebulae, and galaxies in laboratory sessions with telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Meets at the observatory one evening per week from dusk until well after dark, in addition to day-time lectures each week. No previous physics required. Limited enrollment.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 50
  • Introduction to International Relations (INTNLREL 101Z)

    Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.

    Course Code
    POLISCI 101Z
  • What's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach

    How politicians, once elected, work together to govern America. The roles of the President, Congress, and Courts in making and enforcing laws. Focus is on the impact of constitutional rules on the incentives of each branch, and on how they influence law. Fulfills the Writing in the Major Requirement for Political Science majors.

    Course Code
    POLISCI 120Z
  • Political Power in American Cities

    The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances.

    Course Code
    POLISCI 121Z
  • Comparative Corruption (SOC 113)

    Causes, effects, and solutions to various forms of corruption in business and politics in both developing regions (e.g. Asia, E. Europe) and developed ones (the US and the EU).

    Course Code
    POLISCI 143S
  • Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

    Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 10
  • Introduction to Neuroscience

    Introduction to structure and function of the nervous system. The course first surveys neuroscience research methods, physiology, and gross anatomy. We then study the brain systems which produce basic functions such as perception and motion, as well as complex processes like sleep, memory, and emotion. Finally, we examine these principles in cases of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 102S
  • General Psychology

    In what ways does the scientific study of psychology increase our understanding of the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors we observe and experience in everyday life? What are the main areas of psychology and the different questions they seek to answer? This course will give you an introduction to the field of psychology and its many different areas. You will learn about the central methods, findings, and unanswered questions of these areas, as well as how to interpret and critically evaluate research findings.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 105S
  • Introduction to Social Psychology

    This course aims to blend a comprehensive overview of social psychology with in-depth lectures exploring the history of the field, reviewing major findings and highlighting areas of current research. The course will focus on classic studies that have profoundly changed our understanding of human nature and social interaction, and, in turn, have triggered significant paradigm shifts within the field. Some of the topics covered in this class will include: individuals and groups, conformity and obedience, attraction, intergroup relations, and judgment and decision-making. The course, overall, will attempt to foster interest in social psychology as well as scientific curiosity in a fun, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 108S
  • Abnormal Psychology

    This course will provide an introduction to abnormal psychology. It will be targeted towards students who have had little or no exposure to coursework on mental disorders. The course will have three core aims: 1) Explore the nature of mental disorders, including the phenomenology, signs/symptoms, and causal factors underlying various forms of mental illness, 2) Explore conventional and novel treatments for various mental disorders, 3) Develop critical thinking skills in the theory and empirical research into mental disorders. The course will explore a wide range of mental disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, addiction, eating disorders, and personality disorders.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 111S
  • Developmental Psychology

    This class will introduce students to the basic principles of developmental psychology. As well as providing a more classic general overview, we will also look towards current methods and findings. Students will gain an appreciation of how developmental psychology as a science can be applied to their general understanding of children and the complicated process of growing into adults.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 113S
  • Personality Psychology

    This course will focus on current empirical and theoretical approaches to personality. Lectures will be organized around the following questions central to personality research: How and why do people differ? How do we measure individual differences? Does personality change over time? How does personality interact with sociocultural factors to influence behavior? What makes people happy? What are the physical, mental, and social consequences of personalities?

    Course Code
    PSYCH 115S
  • Learning and Memory: Theory and Applications

    This course explores how our behavior in the present is guided by our past experiences, and how we can apply these principles to our own learning and to the broader world around us. We will explore the theory of learning and memory, including an introduction to multiple memory systems, the ways in which memory can succeed but also fail, and how memory integrity changes across the lifespan and across clinical populations. We will also explore applications of this theoretical content to the real world technologies and policies that touch our everyday lives, such as applications in brain training, advertising, the legal system, and the classroom.

    Course Code
    PSYCH 136S

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