2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Historical Fiction: Bringing the Past to Life in Text and Film

    How does the past come to life, on the page and on the screen? From Walter Scott, to Toni Morrison, to the popular romances, films, and television series of today, this course considers a range of texts that draw their settings, characters, and plots from history. We will examine how each work addresses some of the central tensions of historical fiction: between the imagined past and the past as reconstructed through research, between description and the spirit of the past, between accuracy and relevance. Our focus will be on the craft of historical fiction and the power of techniques like description, dialogue, setting, and character to reanimate the past. For the final assessment, students will choose between a traditional argumentative paper and a historical story of their own invention.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 134A
    Instructor(s)
    Llewellyn, T.
    Units
    3-5
  • Queer Poetry in America (AMSTUD 150J, FEMGEN 150J)

    Some poets are known for portraying alternative sexualities in their poetry. Others seem to cover sexuality up. Can we use a poem to determine whether a poet is gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or questioning? Or do some poets simply defy categorization? What makes a poem queer? Is poetry somehow more or less queer than other literary forms? Even if we can answer these questions, what would they tell us about literature in general? This course will investigate such topics and more by tracking queer poetry in twentieth-century America. We'll start with nineteenth-century figures Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, then move on to Gertrude Stein, Hart Crane, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Elizabeth Bishop, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, and others. We'll ask what their poetry meant in their own times, as well as what it means to us in our present era of expanding civil rights and changing sexual attitudes.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 150J
    Instructor(s)
    Tackett, J.
    Units
    3-5
  • Reading Politics: The History and Future of Literacy

    Reading is a political act. Through our major texts of Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, Zora Neale Hurston¿s The Eatonville Anthology, and Azar Nafisi¿s Reading Lolita in Tehran, we will explore the classed, racialized, and gendered power dynamics of literacy and literature. How can books incite social revolutions? How can they maintain harmful inequalities? When is reading a tool of empowerment and when is it a tool of social control? We will examine these questions in a number of contexts, ranging from Victorian London, to the Jim Crow American South, from the Islamic revolution in Iran to a Silicon Valley proliferating with new forms of scientific, technological, and financial literacy. The course includes a significant service learning component, in which students will volunteer to tutor underprivileged readers through Bay Area literacy programs. Final projects will ask students to reflect on these tutoring experiences and consider the complex politics at work in the act of teaching someone to read.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 180B
    Instructor(s)
    Droge, A.
    Units
    3-5
  • Fiction Writing

    The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 90
    Instructor(s)
    Petersen, K.
    Units
    5
  • Fiction Writing

    Online workshop course that explores the ways in which writers of fiction have used language to examine the world, to create compelling characters, and to move readers. We will begin by studying a selection of stories that demonstrate the many techniques writers use to create fictional worlds; we'll use these stories as models for writing exercises and short assignments, leading to a full story draft. We will study figurative language, character and setting development, and dramatic structure, among other elements of story craft. Then, each student will submit a full draft and receive feedback from the instructor and his/her classmates. This course is taught entirely online, but retains the feel of a traditional classroom. Optional synchronous elements such as discussion and virtual office hours provide the student direct interaction with both the instructor and his/her classmates. Feedback on written work ¿ both offered to and given by the student ¿ is essential to the course and creates class rapport.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 90V
    Instructor(s)
    Pufahl, S., Schloesser Tarano, N.
    Units
    5
  • Creative Nonfiction

    (Formerly 94A.) Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 91
    Instructor(s)
    Evans, J.
    Units
    5
  • Reading and Writing Poetry

    Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 92
    Instructor(s)
    Michas-Martin, S.
    Units
    5
  • Creative Expression in Writing

    Online workshop whose primary focus is to give students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 9CV
    Instructor(s)
    Pufahl, S., Schloesser Tarano, N.
    Units
    3
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (CME 102)

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.

    Course Code
    ENGR 155A
    Instructor(s)
    Le, H., Gnanasekaran, A.
    Units
    5
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

    Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Course Code
    ENGR 155C
    Instructor(s)
    Khayms, V., An, J., Slottje, A.
    Units
    4
  • An Intro to Making: What is EE

    Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.

    Course Code
    ENGR 40M
    Instructor(s)
    Bell, S., Lee, C., Chen, C., Gala, J., Kananian, S., Staffa, N., Xiong, H.
    Units
    3-5
  • Programming Methodology (CS 106A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    ENGR 70A
    Instructor(s)
    Troccoli, N., Bedi, R.
    Units
    3-5
  • Programming Abstractions (CS 106B)

    Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    ENGR 70B
    Instructor(s)
    Gregg, C.
    Units
    3-5
  • Environmental Science and Technology (CEE 70)

    Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.

    Course Code
    ENGR 90
    Instructor(s)
    Kopperud, R.
    Units
    3
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    ESS 179S
    Instructor(s)
    Robertson, A., Ong, C.
    Units
    1-2
  • Language of Film

    This course familiarizes students with various elements of film language (cinematography, editing, sound, etc.) and introduces them to a range of approaches to cinematic analysis (authorship, genre, close formal reading, socio-historical considerations). Different types of films (narrative, documentary, and experimental) will be surveyed. Classical narrative cinema will be compared with alternative modes of story-telling.

    Course Code
    FILMSTUD 4S
    Instructor(s)
    Levi, P.
    Units
    3
  • Advanced French Conversation

    Speaking skills and functions including narration, description, supporting opinions, and hypothesizing about current events and issues in France. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: FRENLANG 22C or 23C or equivalent.

    Course Code
    FRENLANG 120S
    Instructor(s)
    Shapirshteyn, V.
    Units
    2
  • Intermediate Conversation: French in Everyday Life

    Same content as 15. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: one year of college French or equivalent.

    Course Code
    FRENLANG 15S
    Instructor(s)
    Shapirshteyn, V.
    Units
    2
  • Accelerated First-Year French, Part 1

    Completes first-year language sequence in two rather than three quarters. Recommended for students with previous knowledge of French who place into FRENLANG 1A on the placement test, or those who are familiar with another Romance language. FRENLANG 2A fulfills the University foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: Placement Test.or consent of coordinator.

    Course Code
    FRENLANG 1A
    Instructor(s)
    Howard, H.
    Units
    5
  • Accelerated First-Year French, Part 2

    Continuation of FRENLANG 1A. Completes first-year language sequence in two rather than three quarters. Recommended for students with previous knowledge of French who place into FRENLANG 1A on the placement test or who are familiar with another Romance language. Fulfills the University foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 1A or Placement Test.

    Course Code
    FRENLANG 2A
    Instructor(s)
    Comsa, M.
    Units
    5
  • Accelerated First-Year German, Part1

    Speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Authentic materials. Interactive approach with emphasis on developing communicative expression. Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters.

    Course Code
    GERLANG 1A
    Instructor(s)
    Petig, W.
    Units
    5
  • Accelerated First-Year German, Part 2

    Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters. Speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Authentic materials. Interactive approach with emphasis on developing communicative expression. For students with previous knowledge of German. Completion of 2A fulfills the Language Requirement

    Course Code
    GERLANG 2A
    Instructor(s)
    Di Dio Di Marco, P.
    Units
    5
  • Global Women Leaders: Past, Present, and Future

    What conditions prompted the emergence of women political leaders around the world and what difference has their leadership made? This course introduces students to global women's history and focuses on a series of individual women leaders in the 20th century. We look at movements for women's self-determination in the 19th and 20th centuries that set the stage for women's emergence as national political leaders and activists in the 20th century. We then focus on a series of global women leaders including Eleanor Roosevelt, Golda Meir, Margaret Thatcher, Benazir Bhutto, Michelle Bachelet and Aung San Suu Kyi. By studying their biographies and historical contributions, we will explore the ways women leaders make distinctive contributions as heads of state and political activists.

    Course Code
    HISTORY 109E
    Instructor(s)
    Horn, M.
    Units
    3-4
  • American History in Film Since World War ll

    U.S. society, culture, and politics since WW II through feature films. Topics include: McCarthyism and the Cold War; ethnicity and racial identify; changing sex and gender relationships; the civil rights and anti-war movements; and mass media. Films include: The Best Years of Our Lives, Salt of the Earth, On the Waterfront, Raisin in the Sun, Kramer v Kramer, and Falling Down.

    Course Code
    HISTORY 168
    Instructor(s)
    Carroll, P.
    Units
    3-4
  • Don Quijote

    Focus is on a close reading of Miguel de Cervantes¿s prose masterpiece. The rise of the novel, the problems of authorship and signification, modes of reading, the status of Muslim and Jewish converts in early modern Spain, the rise of capitalism, masochistic desire. This course will be conducted in English, and no prior knowledge of Spanish is necessary.

    Course Code
    ILAC 159
    Instructor(s)
    Barletta, V.
    Units
    3-5
  • Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention

    The course, traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo, and Sudan. The final session of the course will be devoted to a discussion of the International Criminal Court and the separate criminal tribunals that have been tasked with investigating and punishing the perpetrators of genocide.

    Course Code
    INTNLREL 145
    Instructor(s)
    Patenaude, B.
    Units
    4
  • Accelerated First- Year Japanese, Part 1

    Speaking, reading, writing, and listening. First-year sequence enables students to converse, write and read essays on topics such as personal history, experiences, familiar people. Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters.

    Course Code
    JAPANLNG 1A
    Instructor(s)
    Mukai, E.
    Units
    5
  • Accelerated First-Year Japanese, Part 2

    Speaking, reading, writing, and listening. . First-year sequence enables students to converse, write and read essays on topics such as personal history, experiences, familiar people. Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Japanese. Completes the Foreign Language Requirement.

    Course Code
    JAPANLNG 2A
    Instructor(s)
    Mukai, E.
    Units
    5
  • Lab in Scientific and Critical Thinking: The Emergence of Language

    This course introduces students to the basic skills of critical thinking and provides a venue to apply these skills to a controversial topic: the emergence of human language. We discuss the following questions: what is language? Do animals have it? How did humans begin to talk? How do children learn to speak? In discussing these questions, we cover the basics of the scientific method and critical thinking. Students practice how to read scientific articles, find their main claims, differentiate between factual and theoretical claims, assess the evidence supporting the factual claims, and critically evaluate the arguments. Students practice small scale data collection, hypothesis formation, and hypothesis testing as part of their final project. We discuss the problems that researchers face in each of these phases of research.

    Course Code
    LINGUIST 40S
    Instructor(s)
    Jasbi, M.
    Units
    2-4
  • Language, Society, and Media

    How do people use language to construct identities and achieve interactional goals? How is that language use represented, circulated, and discussed in the media? This course will explore the way that language operates in society with a particular focus on popular and new media. The media, as both a platform for the display and dissemination of linguistic creativity as well as a site for explicit commentary about language, is ripe for analysis of both language use and language attitudes. To do this, we'll examine specific contexts: how public figures, actors, and corporations use language in movies, television, and advertising, and how individuals use language in new media (e.g. YouTube) and on social media (e.g. Twitter). We'll discuss the function of linguistic variation in the construction, recognition, and circulation of social types and conventionalized notions about language.

    Course Code
    LINGUIST 51S
    Instructor(s)
    Pratt, T.
    Units
    3
  • Functions of a Complex Variable

    Complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy integral formula, residues, elementary conformal mappings. (Math 116 offers a more theoretical treatment.) Prerequisite: 52.

    Course Code
    MATH 106
    Instructor(s)
    Ohrt, C., Silliman, J.
    Units
    3
  • Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory

    Algebraic properties of matrices and their interpretation in geometric terms. The relationship between the algebraic and geometric points of view and matters fundamental to the study and solution of linear equations. Topics: linear equations, vector spaces, linear dependence, bases and coordinate systems; linear transformations and matrices; similarity; eigenvectors and eigenvalues; diagonalization. (Math 104 offers a more application-oriented treatment.)

    Course Code
    MATH 113
    Instructor(s)
    Ohrt, C., Dozier, B.
    Units
    3
  • Introduction to Scientific Computing (CME 108)

    Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).

    Course Code
    MATH 114
    Instructor(s)
    Le, H., Aboumrad, G., Horel, E., Lyman, L.
    Units
    3
  • Functions of a Real Variable

    The development of real analysis in Euclidean space: sequences and series, limits, continuous functions, derivatives, integrals. Basic point set topology. Honors math majors and students who intend to do graduate work in mathematics should take 171. Prerequisite: 51.

    Course Code
    MATH 115
    Instructor(s)
    Schaeffer, G., Masullo, A.
    Units
    3
  • Calculus

    Introduction to differential calculus of functions of one variable. Review of elementary functions (including exponentials and logarithms), limits, rates of change, the derivative and its properties, applications of the derivative. Prerequisites: trigonometry, advanced algebra, and analysis of elementary functions (including exponentials and logarithms). You must have taken the math placement diagnostic (offered through the Math Department website) in order to register for this course.

    Course Code
    MATH 19
    Instructor(s)
    Ljungberg, B., Zhang, S., Li, C., Sherman, D.
    Units
    3
  • Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra

    Ordinary differential equations and initial value problems, systems of linear differential equations with constant coefficients, applications of second-order equations to oscillations, matrix exponentials, Laplace transforms, stability of non-linear systems and phase plane analysis, numerical methods. Prerequisite: 51 or equivalents.

    Course Code
    MATH 53
    Instructor(s)
    De Groote, C., Ungemach, W.
    Units
    5
  • The Science of Flames

    This course is about what causes flames to look like they do and about what causes them to propagate. The physical and chemical phenomena that govern behaviors of flames will constitute the topics for discussion. The basic principles that govern flame phenomena include the conservation of mass, the first law of thermodynamics, and the momentum principle. Since flame processes are controlled by the rates of chemical reactions, these basic principles will be applied when account is made for the chemical transformations that occur when reactant bonds are broken and new bonds are formed, producing combustion products. In essence, this course serves as an introduction to combustion science.

    Course Code
    ME 17
    Instructor(s)
    Mitchell, R.
    Units
    3
  • Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs (MS&E 240)

    Non-majors and minors who have taken or are taking elementary accounting should not enroll. Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career. Enrollment limited. Admission by order of enrollment.

    Course Code
    MS&E 140
    Instructor(s)
    Stanton, F.
    Units
    3
  • Discrete Probability Concepts And Models

    Fundamental concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on structuring, model building, and analysis. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Topics include axioms of probability, probability trees, belief networks, random variables, conditioning, and expectation. The course is fast-paced, but it has no prerequisites.

    Course Code
    MS&E 20
    Instructor(s)
    Shachter, R.
    Units
    4
  • Leading Trends in Information Technology

    Focuses on new trends and disruptive technologies in IT. Emphasis on the way technologies create a competitive edge and generate business value. Broad range of views presented by guest speakers, including top level executives of technology companies, and IT executives (e.g. CIOs) of Fortune 1000 companies. Special emphasis in technologies such as Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence, Security, Mobility, and Big Data.

    Course Code
    MS&E 238A
    Instructor(s)
    Barreto, D., Bhatnagar, A., Makhijani, R.
    Units
    1
  • Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs (MS&E 140)

    Non-majors and minors who have taken or are taking elementary accounting should not enroll. Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career. Enrollment limited. Admission by order of enrollment.

    Course Code
    MS&E 240
    Instructor(s)
    Stanton, F.
    Units
    3
  • Introduction to Operations Management

    Operations management focuses on the effective planning, scheduling, and control of manufacturing and service entities. This course introduces students to a broad range of key issues in operations management. Topics include determination of optimal facility location, production planning, optimal timing and sizing of capacity expansion, and inventory control. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of Excel spreadsheets, probability.

    Course Code
    MS&E 260
    Instructor(s)
    Kim, R.
    Units
    3
  • Introduction to Decision Making

    How to ensure focus, discipline, and passion when making important decisions. Comprehensive examples illustrate Decision Analysis fundamentals. Consulting case studies highlight practical solutions for real decisions. Student teams present insights from their analyses of decisions for current organizations. Topics: declaring when and how to make a decision, framing and structuring the decision basis, defining values and preferences, creating alternative strategies, assessing unbiased probabilistic judgments, developing appropriate risk/reward and portfolio models, evaluating doable strategies across the range of uncertain future scenarios, analyzing relevant sensitivities, determining the value of additional information, and addressing the qualitative aspects of communication and commitment to implementation. Not intended for MS&E majors.

    Course Code
    MS&E 52
    Instructor(s)
    Robinson, B.
    Units
    3
  • Introductory Piano Class, Level 1 (Group)

    Piano: Introductory Level 1 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 12AS
    Instructor(s)
    Zerlang, T.
    Units
    1
  • Introductory Piano Class, Level 2 (Group)

    Piano: Introductory Level 2 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 12BS
    Instructor(s)
    Zerlang, T.
    Units
    1

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