2016 Courses

Summer 2017 courses will be available in April.

Summer 2016 courses are available below.

  • Social Psychology of Large-Scale Media Interventions

    As Internet use continues to increase around the globe, social and entertainment media are quickly becoming the preferred modes of communication among the new generation of learners. A growing body of literature suggests that leveraging the psychologically powerful elements of these new forms of media and relevant content can be an effective way to motivate positive behavior and attitude change. Theory-based examples of using media for positive change can be found in areas such as energy consumption, health maintenance, driving safety, and classroom performance. Many other potential applications of this approach have also been identified.nThrough a review of social psychology and media effects literature, this course will provide an introduction to the social science of new media and its potential to affect positive change on a large scale. The first half of the course will be spent exploring psychological processes and associated media effects research to equip students with a fundamental understanding of how humans process interactive media. The second half of the course will leverage this foundation to explore highly social new media and innovative applications of this technology for positive social change. The course will conclude with a group project and presentation that discusses the possibility of using new media to address critical issues in society. Along the way, we will compare different theoretical approaches to media psychology, varying concepts of what constitutes a psychological intervention, and how social media might be used to overcome weaknesses in historical social systems.

    Course Code
    COMM 119S
  • Human Rights and World Literature

    Human rights may be universal, but each appeal comes from a specific location with its own historical, social, and cultural context. This summer we will turn to literary narratives and films from a wide number of global locations to help us understand human rights; each story taps into fundamental beliefs about justice and ethics, from an eminently human and personal point of view. What does it mean not to have access to water, education, free speech, for example?nnThis course has two components. The first will be a set of readings on the history and ethos of modern human rights. These readings will come from philosophy, history, political theory. The second, and major component is comprised of novels and films that come from different locations in the world, each telling a compelling story. nnWe will come away from this class with a good introduction to human rights history and philosophy and a set of insights into a variety of imaginative perspectives on human rights issues from different global locations.nnReadings include:nAmnesty International, Freedom: Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human RightsnAndrew Clapman, Human Rights: A Very Short IntroductionnJames Dawes, That the World May KnownWalter Echo-Hawk, In the Light of JusticenAmitav Ghosh, The Hungry TidenBessie Head, MarunUrsula LeGuin, The Word for World is Forest

    Course Code
    COMPLIT 57
  • Mathematical Foundations of Computing

    Mathematical foundations required for computer science, including propositional predicate logic, induction, sets, functions, and relations. Formal language theory, including regular expressions, grammars, finite automata, Turing machines, and NP-completeness. Mathematical rigor, proof techniques, and applications. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CS 103
  • Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106A
  • Programming Abstractions (ENGR 70B)

    Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106B
  • Client-Side Internet Technologies

    Client-side technologies used to create web sites such as sophisticated Web 2.0 interfaces similar to Google maps. XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, document object model (DOM), AJAX, and Flash. Prerequisite: programming experience at the level of 106A.

    Course Code
    CS 193C
  • Beginning Hip Hop

    Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 58
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    EARTHSYS 179S
  • Principles of Economics

    The economic way of thinking and the functioning of a modern market economy. The behavior of consumers and firms. Markets for goods and inputs. Analysis of macroeconomic variables: output, employment, inflation, interest rate. Determination of long-run growth and short-term fluctuations. The role of government: regulation, monetary, and fiscal policy.

    Course Code
    ECON 1
  • Workshop in Pronunciation for International Students

    (1-2 units). Provides support in the development of clear, comprehensible English pronunciation. Includes attention to individual sounds as well as stress, rhythm, and intonation. Students taking the course for 3 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683P
  • Workshop in Reading and Vocabulary for International Students

    (1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English reading skills for academic purposes, including work on comprehension, speed, and critical interpretation, along with strategies for improving vocabulary. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683R
  • Workshop in Oral Communication for International Students

    (1-2 units) Provides support in the development of listening and speaking skills in English, including academic listening, small group discussion, oral presentation, and intercultural communication. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683S
  • Workshop in Written Communication for International Students

    (1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English writing skills for non-natives. Writing assignments are negotiated with the instructor and may include practice in composition, SAT or TOEFL writing, and writing university application essays and statements of purpose. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683W
  • Language and Culture of Silicon Valley

    Provides an overview of Silicon Valley's unique culture and language patterns via exposure to authentic materials, such as blogs and videos, and interaction with students and professionals in local industry. Participants learn and practice language forms characteristic of this region across all skills. Those taking the course for 2 units will have additional individualized assignments and a 50-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting non-native English speaking undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program. (1-2 units)

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 684S
  • Make It New: Literature of the Jazz Age

    Introduction to modernism through a survey of its major writers and the world in which they wrote. We will look at poets like T.S. Eliot and Gertrude Stein who changed the language, prose-writers like James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway who changed the story, painters like Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse who changed the view, and populists like Louis Armstrong and Charlie Chaplin who changed the scene. Along the way we will think about the basic questions of modernism: Who was involved? How did they interact? And perhaps most importantly, what features make their work modernist? With brief but lively introductions to this world, students will gain entry into academic habits of mind through authors and artists they already love.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 125B
  • American Madness

    This course delves into the bizarre annals of nineteenth-century madness -- the world of Ahab¿s ¿monomania,¿ Edgar Allan Poe¿s ¿brain fever,¿ and Charlotte Perkins Gilman¿s ¿hysteria¿. Placing these literary texts in the context of the historical development of psychiatry during the nineteenth century, we will find that madness often assumes different forms in men and women, white Americans and African-Americans, capitalists and laborers -- suggesting that social inequalities cannot be cleanly separated from biological dispositions in our understanding of insanity. Reading these fictions of madness will not only illuminate the fundamental tensions of American culture, but will give us a new perspective on the construction of mental illness in the contemporary United States.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 127A
  • ¿Wandering in Strange Lands¿: Science Fiction of the Black Atlantic (CSRE 167C)

    African-American culture critic Greg Tate once remarked that ¿Black people live the estrangement that science fiction authors imagine¿. In light of his observation, this course proposes to look at the black science fiction (SF) tradition from a variety of angles. Some examples: How do black authors use familiar speculative tropes, such as encounters with aliens, to comment on matters of race? What happens when tropes from African-American realist fiction, such as the passing narrative, become science fictionalized? How does the intersection of race and gender affect speculative works by black women? And perhaps the most central question: What do we gain by looking at matters of race through the lens of SF?

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 167C
  • The Mystery Plot

    Though the mystery is often equated with a single genre¿detective fiction¿its literary examples stretch beyond the confines of a particular genre or period. This course focuses on the evolution of the modern mystery plot, tracing a long arc from its emergence in the eighteenth-century Gothic novel to its contemporary reinventions in the television procedural and the true crime podcast. Moving from the medieval castle to the urban street, the open sea to the country estate, we will investigate the extraordinary range and resilience of one of the most fundamental narrative forms across historical contexts. We¿ll analyze the use of serial form in Wilkie Collins¿ The Moonstone and the podcast sensation Serial; the invention of the clue and the transformations of the detective in the writings of De Quincey, Poe, Conan Doyle, and Hammett; and the production of suspense in Radcliffe¿s The Mysteries of Udolpho and Melville¿s Benito Cereno. Throughout the course we will pay special attention to the mystery¿s uncertain relationship to the novel, to realism, and to the literary itself.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 167D
  • Reading and Rereading Moby-Dick

    For many, Herman Melville¿s Moby-Dick is the greatest novel in all of American literature, an undisputed classic. When Moby-Dick was first published, however, it was a critical and commercial failure. This class will encourage students to reflect on the nature of literary experience by staging an initial reading of Moby-Dick followed by a somewhat abbreviated second reading. We will consider why readers overlooked Moby-Dick when it was originally published, and why readers later, after a second closer inspection, gained a greater appreciation for the novel. We will think about what happens when we encounter a text for the first time, and how different kinds of meaning might accumulate over multiple readings. We will also watch film adaptations of Moby-Dick in an attempt to comprehend how filmmakers over the course of the twentieth century have re-presented the novel to audiences. In the end, this course offers students the chance to study a literary classic in depth. We will read and reread Moby-Dick to better understand how literature works, and how American literary history has taken shape.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 179E
  • Fiction Writing

    The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 90
  • Creative Nonfiction

    (Formerly 94A.) Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 91
  • Reading and Writing Poetry

    Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 92
  • Introduction to Engineering Analysis

    Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that are the cornerstones of engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses. Prerequisite: AP Physics and AP Calculus or equivalent.

    Course Code
    ENGR 10
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (CME 102)

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.

    Course Code
    ENGR 155A
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

    Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Course Code
    ENGR 155C
  • An Intro to Making: What is EE

    Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.

    Course Code
    ENGR 40M
  • Environmental Science and Technology (CEE 70)

    Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.

    Course Code
    ENGR 90
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    ESS 179S
  • Language of Film

    This course familiarizes students with various elements of film language (cinematography, editing, sound, etc.) and introduces them to a range of approaches to cinematic analysis (authorship, genre, close formal reading, socio-historical considerations). Different types of films (narrative, documentary, and experimental) will be surveyed. Classical narrative cinema will be compared with alternative modes of story-telling.

    Course Code
    FILMSTUD 4S
  • Intensive First-Year French, Part A

    Same as FRENLANG 1. Accelerated. Written exercises, compositions, conversational practice, and daily work. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C.

    Course Code
    FRENLANG 5A
  • Intensive First-Year French, Part B

    Same as FRENLANG 2. Continuation of 5A. Written exercises, compositions, conversational practice, and daily work. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 1 or 5A.

    Course Code
    FRENLANG 5B
  • Intensive First-Year French, Part C

    Same as FRENLANG 3. Continuation of 5B. Written exercises, compositions, conversational practice, and daily work. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Fulfills the University language requirement. Prerequisite 2 or 5B.

    Course Code
    FRENLANG 5C
  • Elementary German for Seniors and Graduate Students

    Intensive. For students who need to acquire reading ability in German for the Ph.D. or for advanced research in their own field. 250 fulfills Ph.D. reading exam.

    Course Code
    GERLANG 10
  • Intermediate German

    Reading short stories, and review of German structure. Discussions in German, short compositions, videos. Prerequisite: one year of college German; or two years high school German or equivalent, or AP German.

    Course Code
    GERLANG 21S
  • Intensive First-Year German, Part A

    Same as GERLANG 1. Accelerated. Written exercices, compositions, conversation practice, and daily work. Only Stanford students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C.

    Course Code
    GERLANG 5A
  • Intensive First-Year German, Part B

    Same as GERLANG 2. Continuation of 5A. Accelerated. Written exercices, compositions, conversation practice, and daily work. Only Stanford students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 1 or 5A.

    Course Code
    GERLANG 5B
  • Intensive First-Year German, Part C

    Same as GERLANG 3. Continuation of 5B. Accelerated. Written exercices, compositions, conversation practice, and daily work. Only Stanford students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 2 or 5B. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.

    Course Code
    GERLANG 5C
  • Global Women Leaders: Past, Present, and Future

    What conditions prompted the emergence of women political leaders around the world and what difference has their leadership made? This course introduces students to global women¿s history and focuses on a series of individual women leaders in the 20th century. We look at movements for women¿s self-determination in the 19th and 20th centuries that set the stage for women¿s emergence as national political leaders and activists in the 20th century. We then focus on a series of global women leaders including Eleanor Roosevelt, Golda Meir, Margaret Thatcher, Benazir Bhutto, Michelle Bachelet and Aung San Suu Kyi. By studying their biographies and historical contributions, we will explore the ways women leaders make distinctive contributions as heads of state and political activists.

    Course Code
    HISTORY 109E
  • American History in Film Since World War ll

    U.S. society, culture, and politics since WW II through feature films. Topics include: McCarthyism and the Cold War; ethnicity and racial identify; changing sex and gender relationships; the civil rights and anti-war movements; and mass media. Films include The Best Years of Our Lives, Salt of the Earth, On the Waterfront, Raisin in the Sun, Kramer v Kramer, Falling Down, and Never Forever, among others.

    Course Code
    HISTORY 168
  • Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention

    The course, traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo, and Sudan. The final session of the course will be devoted to a discussion of the International Criminal Court and the separate criminal tribunals that have been tasked with investigating and punishing the perpetrators of genocide.

    Course Code
    INTNLREL 145
  • Intensive Second-Year Japanese

    Equivalent to 21,22,23 combined. Prerequisite: 3. 5 or consent of instructor. graduate students restricted to 9 units may take the course under JAPANLNG 320. See http://japanese.stanford.edu?page_id=323.

    Course Code
    JAPANLNG 20
  • Intensive First-Year Japanese Language

    Equivalent to 1, 2, and 3 combined. See http://japanese.stanford.edu/?page_id=323. Graduate students restricted to 9 units should enroll in 305.

    Course Code
    JAPANLNG 5
  • Introduction to Scientific Computing (CME 108)

    Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).nGraduate students should take it for 3 units and undergraduate students should take it for 4 units.

    Course Code
    MATH 114
  • Calculus

    Introduction to differential calculus of functions of one variable. Topics: review of elementary functions including exponentials and logarithms, limits, rates of change, the derivative, and applications. Math 19, 20, and 21 cover the same material as Math 41 and 42, but in three quarters rather than two. Prerequisites: precalculus, including trigonometry, advanced algebra, and analysis of elementary functions.

    Course Code
    MATH 19
  • Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables

    Geometry and algebra of vectors, systems of linear equations, matrices and linear transformations, diagonalization and eigenvectors, vector valued functions and functions of several variables, parametric curves, partial derivatives and gradients, the derivative as a matrix, chain rule in several variables, constrained and unconstrained optimization. Prerequisite: 21, or 42, or a score of 4 on the BC Advanced Placement exam or 5 on the AB Advanced Placement exam, or consent of instructor.

    Course Code
    MATH 51
  • The Science of Flames

    This course is about what causes flames to look like they do and about what causes them to propagate. The physical and chemical phenomena that govern behaviors of flames will constitute the topics for discussion. The basic principles that govern flame phenomena include the conservation of mass, the first law of thermodynamics, and the momentum principle. Since flame processes are controlled by the rates of chemical reactions, these basic principles will be applied when account is made for the chemical transformations that occur when reactant bonds are broken and new bonds are formed, producing combustion products. In essence, this course serves as an introduction to combustion science.

    Course Code
    ME 17
  • Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs (MS&E 240)

    Non-majors and minors who have taken or are taking elementary accounting should not enroll. Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career. Enrollment limited. Admission by order of enrollment.

    Course Code
    MS&E 140
  • Discrete Probability Concepts And Models

    Concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on structuring, model building, and analysis. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Topics include axioms of probability, probability trees, belief networks, random variables, conditioning, and expectation.

    Course Code
    MS&E 20
  • Leading Trends in Information Technology

    Focuses on new trends and disruptive technologies in IT. Emphasis on the way technologies create a competitive edge and generate business value. Broad range of views presented by guest speakers, including top level executives of technology companies, and IT executives (e.g. CIOs) of Fortune 1000 companies. Special emphasis in technologies such as Virtualization, Cloud Computing, Security, Mobility and Unified Communications.

    Course Code
    MS&E 238A
  • Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs (MS&E 140)

    Non-majors and minors who have taken or are taking elementary accounting should not enroll. Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career. Enrollment limited. Admission by order of enrollment.

    Course Code
    MS&E 240

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