2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106A
  • Programming Abstractions (ENGR 70B)

    Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106B
    Instructor(s)
    Gregg, C.
    Units
    3-5
  • Client-Side Internet Technologies

    Client-side technologies used to create web sites such as Google maps or Gmail. Includes HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, the Document Object Model (DOM), and Ajax. Prerequisite: programming experience at the level of CS106A.

    Course Code
    CS 193C
    Instructor(s)
    Young, P.
    Units
    3
  • Advanced Ballet

    Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu

    Course Code
    DANCE 149
    Instructor(s)
    Pankevich, A.
    Units
    2
  • Beginning Ballet

    Fundametals of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps, and ballet terms; emphasis on the development of coordination, balance, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 48
    Instructor(s)
    Pankevich, A.
    Units
    1
  • Beginning Hip Hop

    Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 58
    Instructor(s)
    Reddick, R.
    Units
    1
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    EARTHSYS 179S
    Instructor(s)
    Robertson, A., Ong, C.
    Units
    1-2
  • Principles of Economics

    This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond.

    Course Code
    ECON 1
    Instructor(s)
    Leeson, R.
    Units
    5
  • On the Road: American Travel Films

    For more than a century, cars and cinema have occupied a romantic place in the American imagination, as vehicles that can take us someplace new, or engines for our fantasies of mobility, freedom and personal expression. Perhaps this is one reason why the road movie is one of the most enduring subgenres of twentieth-century film. In this class, we¿ll watch ten classic American travel films, one for each decade starting from Buster Keaton¿s silent Go West (1925) and arriving at Christopher Nolan¿s space epic Interstellar (2014). We thus begin on a train and end on a spaceship. In between we¿ll travel by car, bus, motorcycle and even on foot across America and beyond, in search of answers to the motivating questions for this course: what is the attraction of the open road, and how is the romance of its call embraced and challenged by the multiple genres of these films, the concerns of the decades in which they were produced, and the limits they impose on the idea of unrestricted travel, individual growth and independence.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 131B
    Instructor(s)
    Barnhart, L., Johnson, E.
    Units
    3-5
  • Historical Fiction: Bringing the Past to Life in Text and Film

    How does the past come to life, on the page and on the screen? From Walter Scott, to Toni Morrison, to the popular romances, films, and television series of today, this course considers a range of texts that draw their settings, characters, and plots from history. We will examine how each work addresses some of the central tensions of historical fiction: between the imagined past and the past as reconstructed through research, between description and the spirit of the past, between accuracy and relevance. Our focus will be on the craft of historical fiction and the power of techniques like description, dialogue, setting, and character to reanimate the past. For the final assessment, students will choose between a traditional argumentative paper and a historical story of their own invention.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 134A
    Instructor(s)
    Llewellyn, T.
    Units
    3-5
  • Speaking of Baseball (AMSTUD 147A)

    Since its invention in the nineteenth century, baseball has been steeped in lore and rhetoric. A cultural commentator recently pegged it one of three significant American contributions to world culture, along with jazz and the U.S. constitution. Literary and artistic representations of baseball abound, often treating it as more than a game and only a little less than a religion. In this class, we¹ll track representations and grand claims made for baseball by American poets, novelists, and commentators of all sorts. We'll weigh the cornucopia of literary nonfiction depicting the game. The goal will be to map the scope of this literature, defining a tradition's edges, determining its peaks, assessing its limits, challenges, and stakes. This class is open to anyone, whether familiar with the game, or totally new to it. We'll cover a variety of issues: Americana, mythologies of sport, gender and class, race, history, sociology, lots of poetry, and film.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 147A
    Instructor(s)
    Nathan, J.
    Units
    3-5
  • Queer Poetry (FEMGEN 150J)

    Some poets are known for portraying alternative sexualities in their poetry. Others seem to cover sexuality up. Can we use a poem to determine whether a poet is gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or questioning? Or do some poets simply defy categorization? What makes a poem queer? Is poetry somehow more or less queer than other literary forms? Even if we can answer these questions, what would they tell us about literature in general? This course will investigate such topics and more by tracking queer poetry in twentieth-century America. We'll start with nineteenth-century figures Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, then move on to Gertrude Stein, Hart Crane, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Elizabeth Bishop, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, and others. We'll ask what their poetry meant in their own times, as well as what it means to us in our present era of expanding civil rights and changing sexual attitudes.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 150J
    Instructor(s)
    Tackett, J.
    Units
    3-5
  • Animals and the Fictions of Identity (AMSTUD 175E)

    In a post-Darwin world, the notion that we might all have an animal alter-ego lurking inside seems quite familiar. But ideas about animals¿how they think and feel, act and react¿involve identity categories such as race, gender, class and ability in surprising ways. This course will trace the relationship between animality and human life in twentieth-century American fiction, from race and indigeneity in Jack London¿s dog stories to the storytelling practices of contemporary animal advocacy groups. The course may also include an experiential component in which students will have the opportunity to explore multispecies concerns with a local organization.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 175E
    Instructor(s)
    Googasian, V.
    Units
    3-5
  • Reading Politics: The History and Future of Literacy

    Reading is a political act. Through our major texts of Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, Zora Neale Hurston¿s The Eatonville Anthology, and Azar Nafisi¿s Reading Lolita in Tehran, we will explore the classed, racialized, and gendered power dynamics of literacy and literature. How can books incite social revolutions? How can they maintain harmful inequalities? When is reading a tool of empowerment and when is it a tool of social control? We will examine these questions in a number of contexts, ranging from Victorian London, to the Jim Crow American South, from the Islamic revolution in Iran to a Silicon Valley proliferating with new forms of scientific, technological, and financial literacy. The course includes a significant service learning component, in which students will volunteer to tutor underprivileged readers through Bay Area literacy programs. Final projects will ask students to reflect on these tutoring experiences and consider the complex politics at work in the act of teaching someone to read.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 180B
    Instructor(s)
    Droge, A.
    Units
    3-5
  • Fiction Writing

    The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 90
    Instructor(s)
    Petersen, K.
    Units
    5
  • Fiction Writing

    Online workshop course that explores the ways in which writers of fiction have used language to examine the world, to create compelling characters, and to move readers. We will begin by studying a selection of stories that demonstrate the many techniques writers use to create fictional worlds; we'll use these stories as models for writing exercises and short assignments, leading to a full story draft. We will study figurative language, character and setting development, and dramatic structure, among other elements of story craft. Then, each student will submit a full draft and receive feedback from the instructor and his/her classmates. This course is taught entirely online, but retains the feel of a traditional classroom. Optional synchronous elements such as discussion and virtual office hours provide the student direct interaction with both the instructor and his/her classmates. Feedback on written work ¿ both offered to and given by the student ¿ is essential to the course and creates class rapport.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 90V
    Instructor(s)
    Pufahl, S., Schloesser Tarano, N.
    Units
    5
  • Creative Nonfiction

    (Formerly 94A.) Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 91
    Instructor(s)
    Evans, J.
    Units
    5
  • Reading and Writing Poetry

    Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 92
    Instructor(s)
    Michas-Martin, S.
    Units
    5
  • Creative Expression in Writing

    Online workshop whose primary focus is to give students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 9CV
    Instructor(s)
    Pufahl, S., Schloesser Tarano, N.
    Units
    3
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (CME 102)

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.

    Course Code
    ENGR 155A
    Instructor(s)
    Le, H.
    Units
    5
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

    Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Course Code
    ENGR 155C
    Instructor(s)
    Khayms, V.
    Units
    4
  • An Intro to Making: What is EE

    Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.

    Course Code
    ENGR 40M
    Instructor(s)
    Bell, S., Lee, C.
    Units
    3-5
  • Programming Methodology (CS 106A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    ENGR 70A
    Instructor(s)
    Troccoli, N.
    Units
    3-5
  • Programming Abstractions (CS 106B)

    Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    ENGR 70B
    Instructor(s)
    Gregg, C.
    Units
    3-5
  • Environmental Science and Technology (CEE 70)

    Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.

    Course Code
    ENGR 90
    Instructor(s)
    Kopperud, R.
    Units
    3
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    ESS 179S
    Instructor(s)
    Robertson, A., Ong, C.
    Units
    1-2
  • Language of Film

    This course familiarizes students with various elements of film language (cinematography, editing, sound, etc.) and introduces them to a range of approaches to cinematic analysis (authorship, genre, close formal reading, socio-historical considerations). Different types of films (narrative, documentary, and experimental) will be surveyed. Classical narrative cinema will be compared with alternative modes of story-telling.

    Course Code
    FILMSTUD 4S
    Instructor(s)
    Levi, P.
    Units
    3
  • Global Women Leaders: Past, Present, and Future

    What conditions prompted the emergence of women political leaders around the world and what difference has their leadership made? This course introduces students to global women's history and focuses on a series of individual women leaders in the 20th century. We look at movements for women's self-determination in the 19th and 20th centuries that set the stage for women's emergence as national political leaders and activists in the 20th century. We then focus on a series of global women leaders including Eleanor Roosevelt, Golda Meir, Margaret Thatcher, Benazir Bhutto, Michelle Bachelet and Aung San Suu Kyi. By studying their biographies and historical contributions, we will explore the ways women leaders make distinctive contributions as heads of state and political activists.

    Course Code
    HISTORY 109E
    Instructor(s)
    Horn, M.
    Units
    3-4

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