2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Introduction to Organic Chemistry Lab

    Techniques for separation of compounds: distillation, crystallization, extraction and chromatographic procedures in the context of reactions learned in Chem 1. Use of GC instrumentation for the analysis of reactions. Lecture treats theory; lab provides practice. Prerequisite: Chem 33 or Chem 1 co-requisite.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1L
  • Organic Chemistry Lab I

    Hands on exploration of laboratory reactions & phenomena discussed in Chem 1. Learn techniques for separation of compounds: distillation, extraction and chromatography (TLC, GCMS) while investigating the nature and properties of organic compounds such as boiling points, polarity, solubility and chirality. Prerequisite: Chem 33 (or course equivalent) or Chem 1 co-requisite.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1L
  • Organic Monofunctional Compounds

    Second lecture class in summer organic series. Organic chemistry of oxygen and nitrogen aliphatic compounds. Recitation. Prerequisite: Chem 33 or Chem 1.

    Course Code
    CHEM 2
  • Organic Chemistry of Carbonyl Containing Molecules

    Second lecture class in the summer organic intensive series focusing on the synthesis and reactivity of small molecules, with particular emphasis on those that possess the carbonyl functional group. Discuss the importance of the carbonyl functional group to biochemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 33 or Chem 1 or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHEM 2
  • Organic Chemistry Lab I

    Application of separation techniques in the context of reactions learned in Chem 2. Use of IR instrumentation for the analysis of reactions. Lecture treats theory; lab provides practice. Prerequisite: Chem 1L. Co-requisite: Chem 35 or Chem 2. Course equivalent in conjunction with Chem 3L: Chem 130

    Course Code
    CHEM 2L
  • Organic Chemistry Lab II

    Provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry including GCMS, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopy. Learn how chemoselectivity of reactions can be acheived, synthesize bioactive molecules such as pain relievers, and explore how sunscreens can be made more effective. Prerequisite: Chem 1L. Co-requisite: Chem 2.

    Course Code
    CHEM 2L
  • Organic Polyfunctional Compounds

    Last lecture class in summer organic series. Aromatic compounds, polysaccharides, amino acids, proteins, natural products, dyes, purines, pyramidines, nucleic acids and polymers. Recitation. Prerequisite: Chem 35 or Chem 2. Course equivalent: Chem 131.

    Course Code
    CHEM 3
  • Organic Chemistry of Biomolecules

    Third lecture class in summer organic intensive focusing on the structure and reactivity of a class of larger molecules, the biomolecules. Topics covered of interest to biochemistry include aromatic compounds, amines and heterocycles, amino acids, proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids and polymers. Prerequisite: Chem 35 or Chem 2 or course equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHEM 3
  • Chemical Principles I

    For students with moderate or no background in chemistry. Stoichiometry; periodicity; electronic structure and bonding; gases; enthalpy; phase behavior. Emphasis is on skills to address structural and quantitative chemical questions; lab provides practice. Recitation.

    Course Code
    CHEM 31A
    Prerequisites
    GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
  • Chemical Principles II

    Chemical equilibrium; acids and bases; oxidation and reduction reactions; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Lab. Prerequisite: 31A.

    Course Code
    CHEM 31B
    Prerequisites
    GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
  • Organic Chemistry Lab II

    Qualitative and analytical techniques applied to reactions learned in Chem 3. Use of NMR instrumentation for the analysis of reactions. Lecture treats theory; lab provides practice. Prerequisite: Chem 2L. Co-requisite: Chem 131 or Chem 3. Course equivalent in conjunction with Chem 2L: Chem 130

    Course Code
    CHEM 3L
  • Organic Chemistry Lab III

    Advanced organic lab course that introduces multi-step synthesis, NMR spectroscopy, and polymer chemistry. Learn how to use modern analytical and spectroscopic techniques to determine the structure of organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chem 2L or course equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHEM 3L
  • Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese

    Equivalent to 101,102,103 combined if taken together with the Beijing portion of the Summer Program. Five weeks at Stanford and four weeks at Peking University. Prerequisite: 23 or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHINLANG 105
  • Intensive Second-Year Modern Chinese

    Equivalent to 21,22,23 combined if taken together with the Beijing portion of the Summer Program. Five weeks at Stanford and four weeks at Peking University. Prerequisite: 3 or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHINLANG 25
    Prerequisites
    Language
  • Intensive First-Year Modern Chinese

    Equivalent to 1,2,3 combined if taken together with the Beijing portion of the Summer Program. Five weeks at Stanford and four weeks at Peking University.

    Course Code
    CHINLANG 5
  • Greek and Latin Roots of English

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 14
  • Greek and Latin Roots of English

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 14
  • Greek Mythology

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 18.) The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 31
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
  • Greek Mythology

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 18.) The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 31
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
  • Intensive Beginning Latin

    (Formerly CLASSLAT 10/210) Equivalent to a year of beginning Latin (three quarters; CLASSICS 1L, 2: and 3L), this course is designed to teach the fundamentals of the Latin language in eight weeks. We will focus primarily on acquiring the basics of Latin grammar, morphology, and vocabulary and developing basic reading skills. At the end of the course, students should be able to read easy Latin prose and poetry. We will be using Wheelock's Latin textbook and meeting three hours a day, four days a week. Grades will depend on class participation and on performance in weekly quizzes and in a final written exam. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. CLASSICS 4L fulfills the University language requirement.

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 4L
    Prerequisites
    Language
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (ENGR 155A)

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.

    Course Code
    CME 102
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (ENGR 155A)

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.

    Course Code
    CME 102
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

    Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Course Code
    CME 106
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

    Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Course Code
    CME 106
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
  • Introduction to Scientific Computing (MATH 114)

    Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher). Graduate students should take it for 3 units and undergraduate students should take it for 4 units.

    Course Code
    CME 108
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
  • Introduction to Scientific Computing (MATH 114)

    Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).nGraduate students should take it for 3 units and undergraduate students should take it for 4 units.

    Course Code
    CME 108
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
  • Psychology of Technology & Human-Technology Interaction

    Products of design surround us, and shape our lives. This course will explore the human relationship with technology from a psychological point of view, and probe how technology can be designed to work in concert with those who use it. To survey this vast space, the course will cover seminal readings in the areas of human factors, human-computer interaction, product design, and psychology. The course will also delve into the area of design, with a collaborative final project integrating design and psychology.

    Course Code
    COMM 109S
  • Social Media and Information Sharing

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and Myspace, are used as platforms to share information about oneself and others. These new media provide a variety of novel ways to share information (e.g. 'Like', 'Re-tweet', 'Share', etc.) and change the way individuals maintain and create relationships. The goal of this course is to understand emotional and motivational aspects of social media use and examine its potential consequences on individuals' opinions and preferences. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to theories in communication and psychology to have the foundation for understanding the mechanisms underlying media use. In the second half of the course, students will develop original research ideas and have group discussions to further explore and refine those ideas. At the end of the course, students will demonstrate their knowledge of psychological and emotional processes underlying media use and be able to evaluate the individual/social implications of social media use.

    Course Code
    COMM 110S
  • Social Media and Information Sharing

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and Myspace, are used as platforms to share information about oneself and others. These new media provide a variety of novel ways to share information (e.g. 'Like', 'Re-tweet', 'Share', etc.) and change the way individuals maintain and create relationships. The goal of this course is to understand emotional and motivational aspects of social media use and examine its potential consequences on individuals' opinions and preferences. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to theories in communication and psychology to have the foundation for understanding the mechanisms underlying media use. In the second half of the course, students will develop original research ideas and have group discussions to further explore and refine those ideas. At the end of the course, students will demonstrate their knowledge of psychological and emotional processes underlying media use and be able to evaluate the individual/social implications of social media use.

    Course Code
    COMM 110S
  • Welcome to Cyberspace

    This class is designed to interrogate the spatial metaphors often used to describe the Internet. What is "cyberspace" and where do we go when we go "offline"? What is gained through thinking of the Internet as a space and what opportunities are missed? What does this have to do with our physical bodies, capitalism, and the government? During this course we will use historical and contemporary academic writing and literature to interrogate the Internet as a space and a communication technology, and think through the meaning of digital spaces in American culture, business and government.

    Course Code
    COMM 112S
  • Media and Identities in the Globalizing Era

    Globalization, as an imperfect but veritable buzzword, has been used both popularly and academically to describe how the world has become increasingly interconnected in multiple ways. As the Canadian media scholar Marshall McLuhan's famous coined phrase--the "Global Village"-- suggests, the advancement of media technology revolutionizes the ways human beings connect and communicate with one another. By the word "globalizing" (in the title), the course construes trends of globalization both as on-going and deepening processes, and as an ensemble of powerful cultural, economic and social forces productively shaping our lived experiences. With the booming circulation of media/cultural products worldwide and the surging mobility of populations across boundaries, new questions arise: to what extent is the globalization of media production and consumption molded in the Western, especially American, culture? How do non-Western audience consume, interpret and appropriate American products? How do transnational migrants/diaspora negotiate their identities in relation to media representations? What role do new media and digital technology play in the deepening of the globalization processes?nnThrough a critical/cultural examination of the relevant literature and cases, the course helps students better understand topics and issues related to media and identities in the globalizing era. The first half of the course will concentrate on the globalization/localization of media production, the transnational media flows and cultural consumption. The interlocking economic, cultural and political factors that drive these processes are unpacked. The latter half of the course will be devoted to issues about cultural identities, migration and diaspora as well as media representation in multicultural societies. Throughout the course, the roles of both old and new media will be studied in the transnational and global contexts.

    Course Code
    COMM 114S
  • Social Psychology of Large-Scale Media Interventions

    As Internet use continues to increase around the globe, social and entertainment media are quickly becoming the preferred modes of communication among the new generation of learners. A growing body of literature suggests that leveraging the psychologically powerful elements of these new forms of media and relevant content can be an effective way to motivate positive behavior and attitude change. Theory-based examples of using media for positive change can be found in areas such as energy consumption, health maintenance, driving safety, and classroom performance. Many other potential applications of this approach have also been identified.nThrough a review of social psychology and media effects literature, this course will provide an introduction to the social science of new media and its potential to affect positive change on a large scale. The first half of the course will be spent exploring psychological processes and associated media effects research to equip students with a fundamental understanding of how humans process interactive media. The second half of the course will leverage this foundation to explore highly social new media and innovative applications of this technology for positive social change. The course will conclude with a group project and presentation that discusses the possibility of using new media to address critical issues in society. Along the way, we will compare different theoretical approaches to media psychology, varying concepts of what constitutes a psychological intervention, and how social media might be used to overcome weaknesses in historical social systems.

    Course Code
    COMM 119S
  • Human Rights and World Literature

    Human rights may be universal, but each appeal comes from a specific location with its own historical, social, and cultural context. This summer we will turn to literary narratives and films from a wide number of global locations to help us understand human rights; each story taps into fundamental beliefs about justice and ethics, from an eminently human and personal point of view. What does it mean not to have access to water, education, free speech, for example?nnThis course has two components. The first will be a set of readings on the history and ethos of modern human rights. These readings will come from philosophy, history, political theory. The second, and major component is comprised of novels and films that come from different locations in the world, each telling a compelling story. nnWe will come away from this class with a good introduction to human rights history and philosophy and a set of insights into a variety of imaginative perspectives on human rights issues from different global locations.nnReadings include:nAmnesty International, Freedom: Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human RightsnAndrew Clapman, Human Rights: A Very Short IntroductionnJames Dawes, That the World May KnownWalter Echo-Hawk, In the Light of JusticenAmitav Ghosh, The Hungry TidenBessie Head, MarunUrsula LeGuin, The Word for World is Forest

    Course Code
    COMPLIT 57
  • Human Rights and World Literature

    Human rights may be universal, but each appeal comes from a specific location with its own historical, social, and cultural context. This summer we will turn to literary narratives and films from a wide number of global locations to help us understand human rights; each story taps into fundamental beliefs about justice and ethics, from an eminently human and personal point of view. What does it mean not to have access to water, education, free speech, for example?nnThis course has two components. The first will be a set of readings on the history and ethos of modern human rights. These readings will come from philosophy, history, political theory. The second, and major component is comprised of novels and films that come from different locations in the world, each telling a compelling story. nnWe will come away from this class with a good introduction to human rights history and philosophy and a set of insights into a variety of imaginative perspectives on human rights issues from different global locations.nnReadings include:nAmnesty International, Freedom: Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human RightsnAndrew Clapman, Human Rights: A Very Short IntroductionnJames Dawes, That the World May KnownWalter Echo-Hawk, In the Light of JusticenAmitav Ghosh, The Hungry TidenBessie Head, MarunUrsula LeGuin, The Word for World is Forest

    Course Code
    COMPLIT 57
  • Mathematical Foundations of Computing

    Mathematical foundations required for computer science, including propositional predicate logic, induction, sets, functions, and relations. Formal language theory, including regular expressions, grammars, finite automata, Turing machines, and NP-completeness. Mathematical rigor, proof techniques, and applications. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CS 103
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR
  • Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106A
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR
  • Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106A
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR
  • Programming Abstractions (ENGR 70B)

    Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106B
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR
  • Programming Abstractions (ENGR 70B)

    Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106B
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR
  • Client-Side Internet Technologies

    Client-side technologies used to create web sites such as sophisticated Web 2.0 interfaces similar to Google maps. XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, document object model (DOM), AJAX, and Flash. Prerequisite: programming experience at the level of 106A.

    Course Code
    CS 193C
  • Client-Side Internet Technologies

    Client-side technologies used to create web sites such as Google maps or Gmail. Includes HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, the Document Object Model (DOM), and Ajax. Prerequisite: programming experience at the level of CS106A.

    Course Code
    CS 193C
  • Advanced Ballet

    Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu

    Course Code
    DANCE 149
    Prerequisites
    WAY-CE
  • Beginning Ballet

    Fundametals of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps, and ballet terms; emphasis on the development of coordination, balance, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 48
    Prerequisites
    WAY-CE
  • Beginning Hip Hop

    Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 58
  • Beginning Hip Hop

    Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 58
    Prerequisites
    WAY-CE
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    EARTHSYS 179S
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    EARTHSYS 179S
  • Principles of Economics

    This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond.

    Course Code
    ECON 1
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
  • Principles of Economics

    The economic way of thinking and the functioning of a modern market economy. The behavior of consumers and firms. Markets for goods and inputs. Analysis of macroeconomic variables: output, employment, inflation, interest rate. Determination of long-run growth and short-term fluctuations. The role of government: regulation, monetary, and fiscal policy.

    Course Code
    ECON 1
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
  • Workshop in Pronunciation for International Students

    (1-2 units). Provides support in the development of clear, comprehensible English pronunciation. Includes attention to individual sounds as well as stress, rhythm, and intonation. Students taking the course for 3 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683P

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