2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Introductory Piano Class, Level 3 (Group)

    Piano: Introductory Level 3 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 12CS
    Instructor(s)
    Zerlang, T.
    Units
    1
  • Introductory Piano

    Introductory Piano (zero-unit option). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 12SZ
    Instructor(s)
    Zerlang, T.
  • Summer Orchestra

    See website for details: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-mus.... Email instructor with questions: mailto:nhersh61@gmail.com.nBy enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 160S
    Units
    1
  • Summer Orchestra

    See website for details: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-mus.... Email instructor with questions: mailto:nhersh61@gmail.com.nBy enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 160SZ
  • Summer Chorus

    80- to 100-voice non-auditioned ensemble, performing major choral masterworks and choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Concert July 31, 2015 in Memorial Church. Details at: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-mus.... Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit for a total of 0(zero) unit. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 167S
    Instructor(s)
    Ornes, R.
    Units
    1
  • Summer Chorus

    80- to 100-voice non-auditioned ensemble, performing major choral masterworks and choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Concert July 31, 2015 in Memorial Church. For details see: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-mus.... Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit for a total of 0 (zero) unit. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 167SZ
    Instructor(s)
    Ornes, R.
  • Voice Class 1: Beginning Voice, Level 1 (Group)

    Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 65AS
    Instructor(s)
    Linduska, M.
    Units
    1
  • Voice Class 2: Beginning Voice, Level 2 (Group)

    Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 65BS
    Instructor(s)
    Linduska, M.
    Units
    1
  • Beginning Voice

    Beginning Voice (zero-unit option). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 65SZ
    Instructor(s)
    Linduska, M.
  • Intermediate Piano Class (Group)

    Piano: Intermediate Level (Group; 10 students to a section) Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.

    Course Code
    MUSIC 72AS
    Instructor(s)
    Zerlang, T.
    Units
    1
  • Intracellular Trafficking and Neurodegeneration

    Preference to freshmen. Cell structures and functions, the intracellular trafficking system that maintains exchanges of materials and information inside cells, and clinical features and pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases. Techniques for examining cellular and subcellular structures, especially cytoskeletons; functional insights generated from structural explorations. Prerequisite: high school biology.

    Course Code
    NENS 67N
    Instructor(s)
    Yang, Y.
    Units
    3
  • Public Speaking: Romancing the Room

    A practical approach to the art of public speaking. Emphasis is on developing skills in speech types including impromptu, personal experience, interviewing, demonstration, persuasive, and special occasion. Materials include videotape, texts of famous speeches, and a final dinner program of speeches. Students evaluate presentations by others. $55 materials fee. Course was previously offered as CTL 118.

    Course Code
    ORALCOMM 118
    Instructor(s)
    Wagstaffe, J.
    Units
    3
  • Swimming: Beginning I

    This class is for first time swimmers and for individuals who have fear, anxiety or discomfort in water. This class is also designed for individuals who have previously taken beginning swim courses and have had little/no success or who struggle to move through water. A foundation of basic balance and movement skills will be developed through a series of fundamental water exercises. When safety or balance in the water is in question, so is the ability to move, and to some extent, the ability to breathe comfortably. As comfort and balance improves, the easier it is to accept breathing and movement skills. The goal is for a swimmer to become comfortable and in control in both shallow and deep water. The fundamental skills learned in this course will provide a foundation for learning stroke technique, such as freestyle, in an effortless manner. nPrerequisites: None

    Course Code
    PE 128
    Instructor(s)
    Wooter, N.
    Units
    1
  • Swimming: Beginning II

    In this class you will learn how to relax in the water, breath effectively, float and tread, swim 4-5 strokes (freestyle, backstroke, sidestroke, elementary backstroke, and breaststroke, time permitting), jump in the water from the deck, use swimming equipment (kickboards, pull buoys, fins) and swim across a 25- yard pool. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Swim each stroke with proper form and technique (2) Develop an understanding of how to stay healthy and conditioned to further enhance swim strokes and decrease the risk of injuries. (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. nIf you have fear or anxiety in the water, consider taking the PE 128 Confidence in Water class. If you can swim across a 25 yard pool, you should take the PE 131 Intermediate Swim class.nPrereq: non-swimmer, unable to swim across a 25 yard pool.nFEE. (AU).

    Course Code
    PE 129
    Instructor(s)
    Wooter, N.
    Units
    1
  • Swimming: Intermediate

    This class is for those who can swim across a 50-yard pool. In this class you will learn how to: breathe effectively, tread water, dive in from the edge and use swimming equipment (kick boards, pull buoys, hand paddles, fins). You will be introduced to and gain further development of the 4 competitive swimming strokes (Freestyle, Backstroke, Breaststroke & Butterfly). An introduction to flipturns and intervals (50 yard repeats) will be taught. Underwater videotaping and stroke review and analysis will occur. nPrereq: Ability to swim across a 50-yard pool continuously. You MUST be comfortable in deep water, if you are uncomfortable in deep water please take PE 129 Swimming Beginning.

    Course Code
    PE 131
    Instructor(s)
    Wooter, N.
    Units
    1
  • Tennis: Beginning

    Students will learn and develop the essential stroke techniques with emphasis on control. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic play. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 144
    Instructor(s)
    Thornton, M.
    Units
    1
  • Tennis: Advanced Beginning

    Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with emphasis on control, depth, and direction. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic strategy and tactics. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisites: 144, or knowledge of rules and scoring and average ability in fundamental strokes but limited playing experience. Fee. (AU)

    Course Code
    PE 145
    Instructor(s)
    Thornton, M.
    Units
    1
  • Tennis: Intermediate

    Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with more emphasis on depth, direction, and spin. This course will also incorporate basic to advance strategies and tactics with performance enhancing cooperative and competitive drills. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisites:145 or average ability in fundamental strokes, and regular playing experience; NTRP rating of 3.0 -3.5 . (AU)

    Course Code
    PE 146
    Instructor(s)
    Thornton, M.
    Units
    1
  • YOGA: Beginning

    Students will be introduced to the values and skills of Hatha Yoga (Yoga of exercise). Students will learn how to reduce tension, increase energy levels, move efficiently, reconnect to self-awareness, and learn about the body. The poses and flows are adaptable and can be personalized for any level of fitness. The emphasis of the class will be on asanas (poses) and vinyasa (flow) for increased flexibility, improved health, relaxation, and reduced stress in daily living. Students will also be exposed to the language, philosophy, history, and concepts of Yoga. A typical class will include breathing techniques, meditation and asana practice, including standing, balancing, stretching and some inverted poses. At the end of the quarter students will have: (1) Acquired knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Developed physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) A positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 181
    Instructor(s)
    Mitchell, Y.
    Units
    1
  • Yoga/Pilates Fusion

    This class will focus on practicing yoga poses and Pilates exercises to enhance one¿s sense of proprioception, mind-body awareness, and muscular strength and endurance. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 184
    Instructor(s)
    Mitchell, Y.
    Units
    1
  • Golf: Beginning

    This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of the golf swing; putting, chipping, and sand play. We will also cover golf etiquette and rules. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

    Course Code
    PE 51
    Instructor(s)
    Thornton, M.
    Units
    1
  • Golf: Advanced Beginning

    This course allows students to further development their golf swing and short game. This course will also review golf concepts, rules and etiquette. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nnPrerequisite: PE 51 or golf experience.

    Course Code
    PE 52
    Instructor(s)
    Thornton, M.
    Units
    1
  • Golf: Intermediate

    This course allows students to further development their golf game by engaging in various golf drills and the opportunity to practice on all facets of golf. Students will learn how to lower scores and manage the game on the course. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisite: 52 or equivalent. Fee. (AU)

    Course Code
    PE 53
    Instructor(s)
    Thornton, M.
    Units
    1
  • Essentials of Pilates

    Students will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and awareness by engaging in a variety of exercises that integrate the principles of Pilates. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. May be repeat for credit.

    Course Code
    PE 90
    Instructor(s)
    Mitchell, Y.
    Units
    1
  • Philosophy and Emerging Technologies

    This course is an investigation into the philosophical questions raised by emerging technologies such as genetic engineering, self-driving cars, Mars colonization, and interactive art. For each unit, we will first familiarize ourselves with a specific emerging technology, and then look at classic philosophical readings in related topics. We will consider both how these philosophical discussions can help us think about the emerging technology and how the emerging technology might challenge our philosophical preconceptions. Through this course students will become sensitive to the various philosophical issues which new technologies raise, and learn how to apply existing philosophical theories and concepts to new topics and problems. No background in philosophy or familiarity with emerging technologies is required.

    Course Code
    PHIL 29S
    Instructor(s)
    Costello, W.
    Units
    3
  • The Good Life: An Introduction to Ethics

    The basic question of ethics is 'How should I live?' In this course we'll study conceptions of the good human life proposed by philosophers from Ancient Greece to the present day, including Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, J.S. Mill and Simone de Beauvoir. Among the questions we'll be asking are, 'Is moral virtue necessary for personal happiness?' 'Is the good life simply the most pleasant life?' 'What does it mean to live authentically?' 'Can we know how happy we are?' Students will learn how to engage with historical and contemporary ethical texts, and will practice the distinctive analytical skills characteristic of philosophical writing.

    Course Code
    PHIL 39S
    Instructor(s)
    Duffy, H.
    Units
    3
  • Justice and Climate Change

    Global climate change is among the greatest global political challenges of our time. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in 2014 that the warming of Earth's climate system is a certainty and that it is highly likely that human influence is the dominant cause of climate change. Without action to combat climate change, the effects will worsen and could become catastrophic within a century. The effects of climate change are already being felt across the world. Communities in low lying deltas and islands have been relocated or are facing relocation due to rising sea levels. Increased droughts, storm surges, and floods threaten the lives, health and basic needs of people around the world: poor communities are particularly vulnerable. Human-caused climate change raises many questions of justice: First, is it morally wrong to emit greenhouse gases, the major cause of climate change? Is it unfair for wealthy high emitters to continue emitting given the risks of climate change to other people? What priority should be given to the wellbeing of future generations given the costs of reducing GHGs to the current generations? Finally, despite a scientific consensus about climate change's human origins, there is deep political disagreement about the facts about climate change and its alleged human-origins, especially in the United States. How should the government go about making decisions in light of these disagreements; what role should scientific expertise play in democratic deliberations? This course considers justice and climate change across these four dimensions: corrective justice, distributive justice, intergenerational justice, and procedural justice. Our discussions, reading, and writings will work back and forth between the issue of climate change and broader questions within political philosophy. The course is designed to help students develop and practice the skills needed to think and read critically, to communicate effectively across differences through speaking and writing, and to construct arguments that can withstand scrutiny. Students of any discipline are welcome and encouraged to attend. No philosophical background required or presupposed.

    Course Code
    PHIL 42S
    Instructor(s)
    Francis, B.
    Units
    3
  • Modern Political Philosophy: Origins of the U.S. Constitution

    In this course, we consider the political philosophy that culminated in the founding of the U.S. Constitution. We will consider, among other questions:n- What assumptions about human nature were made by thinkers in this tradition?n- What are rights and where do they come from?n- Why do we form government and what is the common good preserved or promoted by government?n- What is required to preserve our political institutions?n- What is the role of law in civil society?n- To what extent does the political success of the U.S. require virtue?nIn this discussion based seminar, we will read Machiavelli, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Lincoln, and the American Founders.

    Course Code
    PHIL 46S
    Instructor(s)
    Espeland, A.
    Units
    3
  • Introduction to Modern Philosophy: Skepticism and Scientific Rationalism

    Focusing on Descartes, Newton, and Leibniz, the course investigates foundational debates in metaphysics and epistemology of modern philosophy. We closely scrutinize Descartes¿ Meditations, which involves radical skepticism of the external world and subsequent proofs that I exist, that God exists, that material bodies exist, and that I am really distinct from my body. Next, we study Newton¿s criticisms of Descartes¿ physical theories of motion and space. We attempt a definition of Newton¿s important concept of `absolute space¿ and observe its role in his proof of universal gravity. Finally, we turn to Leibniz to raise significant philosophical issues with Newtonian spacetime and Cartesian physics. Though our focus is the seventeenth century, we will end with connections to contemporary debates in philosophy of physics.

    Course Code
    PHIL 47S
    Instructor(s)
    Parker, A.
    Units
    3
  • Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

    Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 15
    Instructor(s)
    Liu, W.
    Units
    3
  • The Origin and Development of the Cosmos

    How did the present Universe come to be? The last few decades have seen remarkable progress in understanding this age-old question. Course will cover the history of the Universe from its earliest moments to the present day, and the physical laws that govern its evolution. The early Universe including inflation and the creation of matter and the elements. Recent discoveries in our understanding of the makeup of the cosmos, including dark matter and dark energy. Evolution of galaxies, clusters, and quasars, and the Universe as a whole. Implications of dark matter and dark energy for the future evolution of the cosmos. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 16
  • Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat with Laboratory

    How are the motions of objects and the behavior of fluids and gases determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and understand why objects move as they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how Newton's three laws of motion are applied to solids, liquids, and gases to describe phenomena as diverse as spinning gymnasts, blood flow, and sound waves. Understanding many-particle systems requires connecting macroscopic properties (e.g., temperature and pressure) to microscopic dynamics (collisions of particles). Laws of thermodynamics provide understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and performance limits of heat engines. Everyday examples are analyzed using tools of algebra and trigonometry. Problem-solving skills are developed, including verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer course. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry; calculus not required.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 21S
    Instructor(s)
    Betre, K.
    Units
    5
  • Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics with Laboratory

    How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Students learn to represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. The wave nature of light is used to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena. Geometric optics is employed to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. These descriptions are combined to understand the workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer courses. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or PHYSICS 21S.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 23S
    Instructor(s)
    Wiser, T.
    Units
    5
  • Observational Astronomy Laboratory

    Introduction to observational astronomy emphasizing the use of optical telescopes. Observations of stars, nebulae, and galaxies in laboratory sessions with telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Meets at the observatory one evening per week from dusk until well after dark, in addition to day-time lectures each week. No previous physics required. Limited enrollment.

    Course Code
    PHYSICS 50
    Instructor(s)
    Bailey, V.
    Units
    3

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