2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106A
  • Programming Abstractions (ENGR 70B)

    Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106B
    Instructor(s)
    Gregg, C.
    Units
    3-5
  • Client-Side Internet Technologies

    Client-side technologies used to create web sites such as Google maps or Gmail. Includes HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, the Document Object Model (DOM), and Ajax. Prerequisite: programming experience at the level of CS106A.

    Course Code
    CS 193C
    Instructor(s)
    Young, P., Sadeghian, A.
    Units
    3
  • Advanced Ballet

    Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu

    Course Code
    DANCE 149
    Instructor(s)
    Pankevich, A.
    Units
    2
  • Beginning Ballet

    Fundametals of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps, and ballet terms; emphasis on the development of coordination, balance, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 48
    Instructor(s)
    Pankevich, A.
    Units
    1
  • Beginning Hip Hop

    Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.

    Course Code
    DANCE 58
    Instructor(s)
    Reddick, R.
    Units
    1
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, CEE 279S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    EARTHSYS 179S
    Instructor(s)
    Robertson, A., Ong, C.
    Units
    1-2
  • Principles of Economics

    This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond.

    Course Code
    ECON 1
    Instructor(s)
    Leeson, R.
    Units
    5
  • Workshop in Pronunciation for International Students

    (1-2 units). Provides support in the development of clear, comprehensible English pronunciation. Includes attention to individual sounds as well as stress, rhythm, and intonation. Students taking the course for 3 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683P
    Instructor(s)
    Geda, K.
    Units
    2-3
  • Workshop in Reading and Vocabulary for International Students

    (1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English reading skills for academic purposes, including work on comprehension, speed, and critical interpretation, along with strategies for improving vocabulary. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683R
    Instructor(s)
    QUIJANO, L.
    Units
    1-2
  • Workshop in Oral Communication for International Students

    (1-2 units) Provides support in the development of listening and speaking skills in English, including academic listening, small group discussion, oral presentation, and intercultural communication. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683S
    Instructor(s)
    Geda, K.
    Units
    1-2
  • Workshop in Written Communication for International Students

    (1-2 units). Provides support in the development of English writing skills for non-natives. Writing assignments are negotiated with the instructor and may include practice in composition, SAT or TOEFL writing, and writing university application essays and statements of purpose. Students taking the course for 2 units will have additional individual assignments and a 30-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program.

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 683W
    Instructor(s)
    QUIJANO, L.
    Units
    1-2
  • Language and Culture of Silicon Valley

    Provides an overview of Silicon Valley's unique culture and language patterns via exposure to authentic materials, such as blogs and videos, and interaction with students and professionals in local industry. Participants learn and practice language forms characteristic of this region across all skills. Those taking the course for 2 units will have additional individualized assignments and a 50-minute tutorial each week. Limited to visiting non-native English speaking undergraduates and students in the High School Summer College program. (1-2 units)

    Course Code
    EFSLANG 684S
    Instructor(s)
    Essen, K.
    Units
    1-2
  • On the Road: American Travel Films

    For more than a century, cars and cinema have occupied a romantic place in the American imagination, as vehicles that can take us someplace new, or engines for our fantasies of mobility, freedom and personal expression. Perhaps this is one reason why the road movie is one of the most enduring subgenres of twentieth-century film. In this class, we¿ll watch ten classic American travel films, one for each decade starting from Buster Keaton¿s silent Go West (1925) and arriving at Christopher Nolan¿s space epic Interstellar (2014). We thus begin on a train and end on a spaceship. In between we¿ll travel by car, bus, motorcycle and even on foot across America and beyond, in search of answers to the motivating questions for this course: what is the attraction of the open road, and how is the romance of its call embraced and challenged by the multiple genres of these films, the concerns of the decades in which they were produced, and the limits they impose on the idea of unrestricted travel, individual growth and independence.

    Course Code
    ENGLISH 131B
    Instructor(s)
    Barnhart, L.
    Units
    3-5

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