2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1S)

    This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

    Course Code
    ANTHRO 101S
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

    This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

    Course Code
    ANTHRO 1S
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

    This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

    Course Code
    ANTHRO 1S
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
  • Iconography to Instagram: A History of Images and Information

    This class will survey how artists, designers and cultures have historically used images as a means to organize and communicate information. How do representations convey meaning in a manner different from language? What do visual conventions reveal about the cultures and technologies that shape them? How and why might artists and viewers subvert the legibility of images? To address these questions, this course proceeds by way of close visual analysis of key works, while exploring their historical, technological, social and artistic contexts. nn Topics to be explored include: iconography and interpretation; the relationship between maps and painting; the importance of printmaking to the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution; the visual culture of the newspaper as reflected in (and satirized by) Cubist and Dadaist art; the political impact of photography (illustrated by a visit to an exhibition of Lewis Hine¿s photographs at the Cantor Center for Visual Arts); the rhetorical conventions of television news and advertising. Later weeks will address representational norms which have emerged in the wake of digital technology: multi-screen displays, Powerpoint and interactive infographics, concluding with a discussion around the data-gathering functions of social media platforms such as Instagram. Ultimately, students will learn the fundamentals of visual communication across media and history, but will also reflect on art¿s enduring ability to transcend and resist a purely informational role in culture.

    Course Code
    ARTHIST 158S
  • Plein Air Drawing

    In this introductory class, we take drawing out into the world, exploring different environments, techniques, and approaches as we go. The fundamental nuts-and-bolts of basic drawing techniques: light logic, depicting depth and drawing the figure, are integrated into each environment. From the Stanford campus: its cafe's, architecture and landscaping, to redwoods and water, to more urban settings, drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer, more contemplative work. Through pen, graphite, charcoal, ink, watercolor/gouache and mixed media, we explore dichotomous relationships, as well as those in seemingly perfect harmony. We move from the inanimate to animate, figure and architecture, motion and stillness, to the micro and macro, considering how even the smallest patch of earth may be as monumental as Hoover Tower. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome. Summer.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 141S
    Prerequisites
    WAY-CE
  • Drawing Outdoors

    Leaving the confines of a classroom this course will take place outdoors. The class will visit different sites at Stanford as we experience the transformative power of giving our attention to the world around us. Graphite, charcoal, ink, and mixed media will be used to translate what you see into original works of art. Traditional and contemporary techniques will be incorporated into projects. Students will draw directly from observation while learning elements of perspective, composition, light, and form. The drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer more contemplative work. Each student will complete the course with a wide range of rendering techniques and will gain a historical awareness of artists who have worked in this manner. Honing individual style is encouraged. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 141S
    Prerequisites
    WAY-CE
  • DRAWING AND PAINTING INTENSIVE

    This introductory course teaches the basic tools of drawing and painting with acrylics, along with an introduction to a range of artists for inspiration. From the beginning, we take advantage of Stanford¿s beautiful campus, drawing and painting outside, along with studio work and slide lectures. We begin with our unique gestures and mark-making, moving through linear perspective, light logic, photo-realism, and the figure, using a range of media from graphite and charcoal to bamboo brush and ink. The introduction to acrylic painting explores the many ways we may use acrylic paint, looking at different art historical approaches along the way. A flexible medium, acrylic can be used to mimic watercolor, oil paint, or even cement, and works on a variety of surfaces. We begin by learning color theory and different paint applications through abstract painting, taking as our inspiration Piet Mondrian, Hans Hofmann, and J.W. Turner. Using thick, impasto paint, we move outdoors for plein air painting, stealing strategies from the Impressionists, and adapting them in our personal projects with today¿s technologies. Moving back indoors, we switch it up again, exploring the expressive gesture, and figurative distortion, using acrylic now more thinly, a la watercolor or gouache, along with charcoal, creating dramatic effects, and working on different surfaces. Each student will finish the quarter with a wide range of techniques and materials at the ready. No previous painting or drawing experience is necessary.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 147S
    Prerequisites
    WAY-CE
  • DRAWING AND PAINTING INTENSIVE

    This introductory course teaches the basic tools of drawing and painting with acrylics, along with an introduction to a range of artists for inspiration. From the beginning, we take advantage of Stanford¿s beautiful campus, drawing and painting outside, along with studio work and slide lectures. We begin with our unique gestures and mark-making, moving through linear perspective, light logic, photo-realism, and the figure, using a range of media from graphite and charcoal to bamboo brush and ink. The introduction to acrylic painting explores the many ways we may use acrylic paint, looking at different art historical approaches along the way. A flexible medium, acrylic can be used to mimic watercolor, oil paint, or even cement, and works on a variety of surfaces. We begin by learning color theory and different paint applications through abstract painting, taking as our inspiration Piet Mondrian, Hans Hofmann, and J.W. Turner. Using thick, impasto paint, we move outdoors for plein air painting, stealing strategies from the Impressionists, and adapting them in our personal projects with today¿s technologies. Moving back indoors, we switch it up again, exploring the expressive gesture, and figurative distortion, using acrylic now more thinly, a la watercolor or gouache, along with charcoal, creating dramatic effects, and working on different surfaces. Each student will finish the quarter with a wide range of techniques and materials at the ready. No previous painting or drawing experience is necessary.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 147S
    Prerequisites
    WAY-CE
  • PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

    Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17"-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 171S
  • Maintenance of the Genome

    The precious blueprint for life is entrusted to genome maintenance proteins found in all living cells. This seminar introduces the remarkable systems that scan cellular DNA for alterations and make repairs to ensure genomic stability. We further explore how deficiencies in these systems can lead to developmental defects, premature aging, and predisposition to cancer. Course includes background reading from primary articles, introductory lectures, student presentations, and a short term paper. Prerequisites: High school Biology. Preference to Stanford students.

    Course Code
    BIO 26S
  • Introduction to cancer biology

    Introduction to the molecular basis of cancer. This course will examine the biological processes that are disrupted in cancer, such as DNA repair, cell cycle control and signaling pathways, as well as the science behind some current treatments. Prerequisites: general biology

    Course Code
    BIO 50S
  • The Gene: The History and Science of our Genetic Code

    This discussion-based course will use the novel ¿The gene¿ by Siddhartha Mukherjee and other selected readings to explore the science behind our genetic code. We will cover topics such as regulation of gene expression, inheritance, genetic testing, manipulation of the genome, and the relationship between genetics and identity. Prerequisites: Instructor consent, AP Biology Recommended.

    Course Code
    BIO 51S
  • Introduction to Biology

    Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.

    Course Code
    BIO 7S
    Prerequisites
    GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
  • Introduction to Biology

    Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.

    Course Code
    BIO 7S
    Prerequisites
    GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
  • Introduction to Biology Lab

    Optional laboratory to be taken with BIO7S. Introduction to basic biological laboratory techniques, including microscopy, identification of biomolecules, assaying enzyme activity, genetic manipulation of microorganisms, assaying the effects of gene mutation on protein function, and using PCR to genotype organisms.

    Course Code
    BIO 7SL
  • Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 201S)

    Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.

    Course Code
    CEE 101S
  • Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 201S)

    Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.

    Course Code
    CEE 101S
  • Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools (CEE 207S)

    Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.

    Course Code
    CEE 107S
  • Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools (CEE 207S)

    Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.

    Course Code
    CEE 107S
  • Water Resources Management (CEE 265C)

    Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.

    Course Code
    CEE 165C
  • Water Resources Management (CEE 265C)

    Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.

    Course Code
    CEE 165C
  • New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability (CEE 271F)

    Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.

    Course Code
    CEE 171F
  • Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 275P)

    Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.

    Course Code
    CEE 175P
  • Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 275P)

    Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.

    Course Code
    CEE 175P
  • Changing Human Behavior: Drivers and Barriers in Environmental Action (CEE 275Q)

    Beyond the scientific and technological challenges of climate change, there are important psychological factors and barriers to individual attitude and behavior change. Students will analyze and identify barriers to individual action; distinguish between targeting individual behaviors vs. attitudes; understand specific psychological challenges and opportunities that climate change raises; develop strategies to address these factors in contexts where behavior change is sought. Students will propose and develop their own ideas for addressing a specific psychological barrier to individual action in an environmental context.

    Course Code
    CEE 175Q
  • Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 275S)

    Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.

    Course Code
    CEE 175S
  • Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 275S)

    Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.

    Course Code
    CEE 175S
  • Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 276G)

    Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.

    Course Code
    CEE 176G
  • Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 276G)

    Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.

    Course Code
    CEE 176G
  • Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

    The role of information technology (IT) in enabling mankind to improve the operations and sustainability of cities and communities. Review of what a "smarter" city of community might be, the role of IT in enabling them to become "smarter" (including what IT cannot achieve). Case studies on water, transportation, resilience, and open data & citizen sensing.

    Course Code
    CEE 177L
  • Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

    A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.

    Course Code
    CEE 177L
  • Smart Cities & Communities II (CEE 277M)

    Exploration of the informatics toolkit (internet of things, cloud, analytics, systems of engagement) for creating 'smarter' cities and communities. Case studies on energy, buildings, urban design, public services, and food complement the systems addressed in CEE 177L (for CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M). Panel of experts will frame opportunities and challenges.nCo-requisite: concurrent registration in CEE 177L for (CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M).

    Course Code
    CEE 177M
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    CEE 179S
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    CEE 179S
  • Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 101S)

    Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.

    Course Code
    CEE 201S
  • Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools (CEE 107S)

    Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.

    Course Code
    CEE 207S
  • Water Resources Management (CEE 165C)

    Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.

    Course Code
    CEE 265C
  • New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability (CEE 171F)

    Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.

    Course Code
    CEE 271F
  • Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 175P)

    Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.

    Course Code
    CEE 275P
  • Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 175S)

    Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.

    Course Code
    CEE 275S
  • Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 176G)

    Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.

    Course Code
    CEE 276G
  • Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 177L)

    The role of information technology (IT) in enabling mankind to improve the operations and sustainability of cities and communities. Review of what a "smarter" city of community might be, the role of IT in enabling them to become "smarter" (including what IT cannot achieve). Case studies on water, transportation, resilience, and open data & citizen sensing.

    Course Code
    CEE 277L
  • Smart Cities & Communities II (CEE 177M)

    Exploration of the informatics toolkit (internet of things, cloud, analytics, systems of engagement) for creating 'smarter' cities and communities. Case studies on energy, buildings, urban design, public services, and food complement the systems addressed in CEE 177L (for CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M). Panel of experts will frame opportunities and challenges.nCo-requisite: concurrent registration in CEE 177L for (CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M).

    Course Code
    CEE 277M
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    CEE 279S
  • Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

    Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.

    Course Code
    CEE 70
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
  • Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

    Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.

    Course Code
    CEE 70
    Prerequisites
    GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
  • Foundations of Water Science and Engineering

    No water, no life. Water shapes the earth. Its utilization, management, and control are critical concerns of all human societies. This class introduces basic scientific and engineering concepts and applies them to aquatic systems. We explore how water properties and processes act to sustain the planet and how human actions modify (for both good and ill) our water world.

    Course Code
    CEE 73
  • Water: An Introduction

    Lake Tahoe's waters are so clear you can follow a diver 70 feet below your boat. A Lake Erie summer often means that nearshore waters have a green surface scum obscuring everything below. California, suffering from drought, is seriously considering reclamation and direct potable reuse of sewage -- aka toilet to tap. Can we (or should we) do this? Why is Tahoe clear, Erie green? This class introduces students to the fundamental tools and science used to understand and manage both natural and human-engineered water systems. Each student will use these tools to explore a water topic of their choosing.

    Course Code
    CEE 73
  • Structure and Reactivity

    First lecture class in summer organic series. Organic chemistry, functional groups, hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, thermochemistry, kinetics and chemical equilibria. Recitation. Prerequisite: 31 A, B or 31 X or an AP Chemistry score of 5.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1
  • Introduction to Organic Chemistry

    First lecture class in summer organic intensive designed for those entering the medical field. Introduction to molecular structure and reactivity of functional groups. Explore chemical reactivity in the context of kinetics and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: College level general chemistry or an AP Chemistry score of 5.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1

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