2017 Courses

High School Summer College more than 145 courses allow students to explore, collaborate, and challenge themselves while gaining confidence and meeting new peers.

Students in our programs should always refer to this list; these are the only courses available to the students we admit for the Summer Quarter. Current Stanford students have additional options available for summer enrollment. An academic advisor will verify students enrollments. 

  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

    This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

    Course Code
    ANTHRO 1S
    Instructor(s)
    Sugimoto, T., Takabvirwa, K.
    Units
    3-5
  • American Art Since 1776

    How have artworks and artifacts shaped life and culture in the United States? This course considers a variety of objects, from canonical eighteenth-century paintings to decorative art, children's books, outsider art, and other creative expressions often overlooked in traditional surveys. How do art historians come to know such objects and, importantly, the past with them? How might we understand the historical implications of visual and material culture and share them in our writing? Close and creative looking, methodologies from art history and material culture studies, and an engagement with the wider visual, material, and literary worlds of these years will help us explore these and other questions. A final paper produced in stages throughout the term will afford students an opportunity to produce a six-page art historical essay of their own on an artwork or artifact of their choosing, preferably in a local collection. What might these objects and their study reveal to us about our history, present, and future?

    Course Code
    ARTHIST 154C
    Instructor(s)
    Larnerd, J.
    Units
    3
  • Plein Air Drawing

    In this introductory class, we take drawing out into the world, exploring different environments, techniques, and approaches as we go. The fundamental nuts-and-bolts of basic drawing techniques: light logic, depicting depth and drawing the figure, are integrated into each environment. From the Stanford campus: its cafe's, architecture and landscaping, to redwoods and water, to more urban settings, drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer, more contemplative work. Through pen, graphite, charcoal, ink, watercolor/gouache and mixed media, we explore dichotomous relationships, as well as those in seemingly perfect harmony. We move from the inanimate to animate, figure and architecture, motion and stillness, to the micro and macro, considering how even the smallest patch of earth may be as monumental as Hoover Tower. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome. Summer.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 141S
    Instructor(s)
    Toomer, L.
    Units
    3
  • DRAWING AND PAINTING INTENSIVE

    This introductory course teaches the basic tools of drawing and painting with acrylics, along with an introduction to a range of artists for inspiration. From the beginning, we take advantage of Stanford¿s beautiful campus, drawing and painting outside, along with studio work and slide lectures. We begin with our unique gestures and mark-making, moving through linear perspective, light logic, photo-realism, and the figure, using a range of media from graphite and charcoal to bamboo brush and ink. The introduction to acrylic painting explores the many ways we may use acrylic paint, looking at different art historical approaches along the way. A flexible medium, acrylic can be used to mimic watercolor, oil paint, or even cement, and works on a variety of surfaces. We begin by learning color theory and different paint applications through abstract painting, taking as our inspiration Piet Mondrian, Hans Hofmann, and J.W. Turner. Using thick, impasto paint, we move outdoors for plein air painting, stealing strategies from the Impressionists, and adapting them in our personal projects with today¿s technologies. Moving back indoors, we switch it up again, exploring the expressive gesture, and figurative distortion, using acrylic now more thinly, a la watercolor or gouache, along with charcoal, creating dramatic effects, and working on different surfaces. Each student will finish the quarter with a wide range of techniques and materials at the ready. No previous painting or drawing experience is necessary.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 147S
    Instructor(s)
    Deas, Y.
    Units
    3
  • PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

    Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17"-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 171S
    Instructor(s)
    Peck, S.
    Units
    3
  • Maintenance of the Genome

    The precious blueprint for life is entrusted to genome maintenance proteins found in all living cells. This seminar introduces the remarkable systems that scan cellular DNA for alterations and make repairs to ensure genomic stability. We further explore how deficiencies in these systems can lead to developmental defects, premature aging, and predisposition to cancer. Course includes background reading from primary articles, introductory lectures, student presentations, and a short term paper. Prerequisites: High school Biology. Preference to Stanford students.

    Course Code
    BIO 26S
    Instructor(s)
    Schwartz, E.
    Units
    3
  • The Gene: The History and Science of our Genetic Code

    This discussion-based course will use the novel ¿The gene¿ by Siddhartha Mukherjee and other selected readings to explore the science behind our genetic code. We will cover topics such as regulation of gene expression, inheritance, genetic testing, manipulation of the genome, and the relationship between genetics and identity. Prerequisites: Instructor consent, AP Biology Recommended.

    Course Code
    BIO 51S
    Instructor(s)
    Imam, J.
    Units
    3
  • Introduction to Biology

    Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.

    Course Code
    BIO 7S
    Instructor(s)
    Schwartz, E.
    Units
    3
  • Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 201S)

    Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.

    Course Code
    CEE 101S
    Instructor(s)
    Fong, D.
    Units
    3
  • Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools (CEE 207S)

    Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.

    Course Code
    CEE 107S
    Instructor(s)
    Grubert, E., Knapp, K.
    Units
    3
  • Water Resources Management (CEE 265C)

    Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.

    Course Code
    CEE 165C
    Instructor(s)
    Findikakis, A.
    Units
    3
  • Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 275P)

    Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.

    Course Code
    CEE 175P
    Instructor(s)
    Stanton, C.
    Units
    2
  • Changing Human Behavior: Drivers and Barriers in Environmental Action (CEE 275Q)

    Beyond the scientific and technological challenges of climate change, there are important psychological factors and barriers to individual attitude and behavior change. Students will analyze and identify barriers to individual action; distinguish between targeting individual behaviors vs. attitudes; understand specific psychological challenges and opportunities that climate change raises; develop strategies to address these factors in contexts where behavior change is sought. Students will propose and develop their own ideas for addressing a specific psychological barrier to individual action in an environmental context.

    Course Code
    CEE 175Q
    Instructor(s)
    Wang, J., Ong, C.
    Units
    2
  • Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 275S)

    Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.

    Course Code
    CEE 175S
    Instructor(s)
    Robertson, A., Shelander, W., Ong, C.
    Units
    3
  • Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 276G)

    Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.

    Course Code
    CEE 176G
    Instructor(s)
    Katz, G.
    Units
    3
  • Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

    A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.

    Course Code
    CEE 177L
    Instructor(s)
    Lechner, R.
    Units
    3
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    CEE 179S
    Instructor(s)
    Robertson, A., Ong, C.
    Units
    1-2
  • Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

    Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.

    Course Code
    CEE 70
    Instructor(s)
    Kopperud, R.
    Units
    3
  • Water: An Introduction

    Lake Tahoe's waters are so clear you can follow a diver 70 feet below your boat. A Lake Erie summer often means that nearshore waters have a green surface scum obscuring everything below. California, suffering from drought, is seriously considering reclamation and direct potable reuse of sewage -- aka toilet to tap. Can we (or should we) do this? Why is Tahoe clear, Erie green? This class introduces students to the fundamental tools and science used to understand and manage both natural and human-engineered water systems. Each student will use these tools to explore a water topic of their choosing.

    Course Code
    CEE 73
    Instructor(s)
    Fong, D., Pieja, A., Robertson, A.
    Units
    3
  • Introduction to Organic Chemistry

    First lecture class in summer organic intensive designed for those entering the medical field. Introduction to molecular structure and reactivity of functional groups. Explore chemical reactivity in the context of kinetics and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: College level general chemistry or an AP Chemistry score of 5.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1
    Instructor(s)
    Cox, C.
    Units
    4
  • Organic Chemistry Lab I

    Hands on exploration of laboratory reactions & phenomena discussed in Chem 1. Learn techniques for separation of compounds: distillation, extraction and chromatography (TLC, GCMS) while investigating the nature and properties of organic compounds such as boiling points, polarity, solubility and chirality. Prerequisite: Chem 33 (or course equivalent) or Chem 1 co-requisite.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1L
    Instructor(s)
    Schwartz Poehlmann, J.
    Units
    2
  • Organic Chemistry of Carbonyl Containing Molecules

    Second lecture class in the summer organic intensive series focusing on the synthesis and reactivity of small molecules, with particular emphasis on those that possess the carbonyl functional group. Discuss the importance of the carbonyl functional group to biochemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 33 or Chem 1 or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHEM 2
    Instructor(s)
    Gray, E.
    Units
    4
  • Organic Chemistry Lab II

    Provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry including GCMS, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopy. Learn how chemoselectivity of reactions can be acheived, synthesize bioactive molecules such as pain relievers, and explore how sunscreens can be made more effective. Prerequisite: Chem 1L. Co-requisite: Chem 2.

    Course Code
    CHEM 2L
    Instructor(s)
    Cox, C.
    Units
    2
  • Organic Chemistry of Biomolecules

    Third lecture class in summer organic intensive focusing on the structure and reactivity of a class of larger molecules, the biomolecules. Topics covered of interest to biochemistry include aromatic compounds, amines and heterocycles, amino acids, proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids and polymers. Prerequisite: Chem 35 or Chem 2 or course equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHEM 3
    Instructor(s)
    Brennan, M.
    Units
    4
  • Chemical Principles I

    For students with moderate or no background in chemistry. Stoichiometry; periodicity; electronic structure and bonding; gases; enthalpy; phase behavior. Emphasis is on skills to address structural and quantitative chemical questions; lab provides practice. Recitation.

    Course Code
    CHEM 31A
    Instructor(s)
    Cardin, N.
    Units
    5
  • Chemical Principles II

    Chemical equilibrium; acids and bases; oxidation and reduction reactions; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 31A.

    Course Code
    CHEM 31B
    Instructor(s)
    Cardin, N.
    Units
    5
  • Organic Chemistry Lab III

    Advanced organic lab course that introduces multi-step synthesis, NMR spectroscopy, and polymer chemistry. Learn how to use modern analytical and spectroscopic techniques to determine the structure of organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chem 2L or course equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHEM 3L
    Instructor(s)
    Brennan, M.
    Units
    2
  • Greek and Latin Roots of English

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 14
    Instructor(s)
    Melzer, A.
    Units
    3
  • Greek Mythology

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 18.) The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 31
    Instructor(s)
    Sansom, S.
    Units
    3-5
  • Intensive Beginning Latin

    (Formerly CLASSLAT 10/210) Equivalent to a year of beginning Latin (three quarters; CLASSICS 1L, 2: and 3L), this course is designed to teach the fundamentals of the Latin language in eight weeks. We will focus primarily on acquiring the basics of Latin grammar, morphology, and vocabulary and developing basic reading skills. At the end of the course, students should be able to read easy Latin prose and poetry. We will be using Wheelock's Latin textbook and meeting three hours a day, four days a week. Grades will depend on class participation and on performance in weekly quizzes and in a final written exam. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. CLASSICS 4L fulfills the University language requirement.

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 4L
    Instructor(s)
    Shi, R.
    Units
    12
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (ENGR 155A)

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.

    Course Code
    CME 102
    Instructor(s)
    Le, H., Gnanasekaran, A.
    Units
    5
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

    Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Course Code
    CME 106
    Instructor(s)
    Khayms, V., An, J., Slottje, A.
    Units
    4
  • Introduction to Scientific Computing (MATH 114)

    Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).

    Course Code
    CME 108
    Instructor(s)
    Le, H., Aboumrad, G., Horel, E., Lyman, L.
    Units
    3
  • Social Media and Information Sharing

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and Myspace, are used as platforms to share information about oneself and others. These new media provide a variety of novel ways to share information (e.g. 'Like', 'Re-tweet', 'Share', etc.) and change the way individuals maintain and create relationships. The goal of this course is to understand emotional and motivational aspects of social media use and examine its potential consequences on individuals' opinions and preferences. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to theories in communication and psychology to have the foundation for understanding the mechanisms underlying media use. In the second half of the course, students will develop original research ideas and have group discussions to further explore and refine those ideas. At the end of the course, students will demonstrate their knowledge of psychological and emotional processes underlying media use and be able to evaluate the individual/social implications of social media use.

    Course Code
    COMM 110S
    Instructor(s)
    Kim, S.
    Units
    3
  • Welcome to Cyberspace

    This class is designed to interrogate the spatial metaphors often used to describe the Internet. What is "cyberspace" and where do we go when we go "offline"? What is gained through thinking of the Internet as a space and what opportunities are missed? What does this have to do with our physical bodies, capitalism, and the government? During this course we will use historical and contemporary academic writing and literature to interrogate the Internet as a space and a communication technology, and think through the meaning of digital spaces in American culture, business and government.

    Course Code
    COMM 112S
    Instructor(s)
    Gibson, A.
    Units
    3
  • Machines as Media

    Technological change has always been surrounded by two competing narratives: that of opportunity and human flourishing, versus that of displacement and alienation. This course explores the idea that machines themselves are media in terms of which people - to use the words of James Carey - represent, maintain, adapt, and share their hopes and fears about the world. By the end of the course, students will have developed a vocabulary for thinking about technology's role in the ways that people have made sense of utopia and dystopia. Readings will include a mix of theory and historical case studies. From the first category, possible authors include Jacques Ellul, Leo Marx, Norman O. Brown, Martin Heidegger, Walter Benjamin, and Jessica Riskin. From the second category, possible topics include 18th-century automata, the English and French Luddite movements, the American Machine Breakers movement, Taylorism and technocracy. Note: preparation and participation in discussion are the primary course requirements. Enrollment at 3 units requires a short final paper, while a more substantial paper is required at 4 units.

    Course Code
    COMM 117S
    Instructor(s)
    Dole, L.
    Units
    3-4
  • Human Rights and World Literature

    Human rights may be universal, but each appeal comes from a specific location with its own historical, social, and cultural context. This summer we will turn to literary narratives and films from a wide number of global locations to help us understand human rights; each story taps into fundamental beliefs about justice and ethics, from an eminently human and personal point of view. What does it mean not to have access to water, education, free speech, for example?nnThis course has two components. The first will be a set of readings on the history and ethos of modern human rights. These readings will come from philosophy, history, political theory. The second, and major component is comprised of novels and films that come from different locations in the world, each telling a compelling story. nnWe will come away from this class with a good introduction to human rights history and philosophy and a set of insights into a variety of imaginative perspectives on human rights issues from different global locations.nnReadings include:nAmnesty International, Freedom: Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human RightsnAndrew Clapman, Human Rights: A Very Short IntroductionnJames Dawes, That the World May KnownWalter Echo-Hawk, In the Light of JusticenAmitav Ghosh, The Hungry TidenBessie Head, MarunUrsula LeGuin, The Word for World is Forest

    Course Code
    COMPLIT 57
    Instructor(s)
    Palumbo-Liu, D.
    Units
    5
  • Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

    Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.

    Course Code
    CS 106A
    Instructor(s)
    Troccoli, N.
    Units
    3-5

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