2016 Courses

Summer 2017 courses will be available in April.

Summer 2016 courses are available below.

  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1S)

    This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

    Course Code
    ANTHRO 101S
  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

    This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

    Course Code
    ANTHRO 1S
  • Iconography to Instagram: A History of Images and Information

    This class will survey how artists, designers and cultures have historically used images as a means to organize and communicate information. How do representations convey meaning in a manner different from language? What do visual conventions reveal about the cultures and technologies that shape them? How and why might artists and viewers subvert the legibility of images? To address these questions, this course proceeds by way of close visual analysis of key works, while exploring their historical, technological, social and artistic contexts. nn Topics to be explored include: iconography and interpretation; the relationship between maps and painting; the importance of printmaking to the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution; the visual culture of the newspaper as reflected in (and satirized by) Cubist and Dadaist art; the political impact of photography (illustrated by a visit to an exhibition of Lewis Hine¿s photographs at the Cantor Center for Visual Arts); the rhetorical conventions of television news and advertising. Later weeks will address representational norms which have emerged in the wake of digital technology: multi-screen displays, Powerpoint and interactive infographics, concluding with a discussion around the data-gathering functions of social media platforms such as Instagram. Ultimately, students will learn the fundamentals of visual communication across media and history, but will also reflect on art¿s enduring ability to transcend and resist a purely informational role in culture.

    Course Code
    ARTHIST 158S
  • Drawing Outdoors

    Leaving the confines of a classroom this course will take place outdoors. The class will visit different sites at Stanford as we experience the transformative power of giving our attention to the world around us. Graphite, charcoal, ink, and mixed media will be used to translate what you see into original works of art. Traditional and contemporary techniques will be incorporated into projects. Students will draw directly from observation while learning elements of perspective, composition, light, and form. The drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer more contemplative work. Each student will complete the course with a wide range of rendering techniques and will gain a historical awareness of artists who have worked in this manner. Honing individual style is encouraged. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 141S
  • DRAWING AND PAINTING INTENSIVE

    This introductory course teaches the basic tools of drawing and painting with acrylics, along with an introduction to a range of artists for inspiration. From the beginning, we take advantage of Stanford¿s beautiful campus, drawing and painting outside, along with studio work and slide lectures. We begin with our unique gestures and mark-making, moving through linear perspective, light logic, photo-realism, and the figure, using a range of media from graphite and charcoal to bamboo brush and ink. The introduction to acrylic painting explores the many ways we may use acrylic paint, looking at different art historical approaches along the way. A flexible medium, acrylic can be used to mimic watercolor, oil paint, or even cement, and works on a variety of surfaces. We begin by learning color theory and different paint applications through abstract painting, taking as our inspiration Piet Mondrian, Hans Hofmann, and J.W. Turner. Using thick, impasto paint, we move outdoors for plein air painting, stealing strategies from the Impressionists, and adapting them in our personal projects with today¿s technologies. Moving back indoors, we switch it up again, exploring the expressive gesture, and figurative distortion, using acrylic now more thinly, a la watercolor or gouache, along with charcoal, creating dramatic effects, and working on different surfaces. Each student will finish the quarter with a wide range of techniques and materials at the ready. No previous painting or drawing experience is necessary.

    Course Code
    ARTSTUDI 147S
  • Introduction to cancer biology

    Introduction to the molecular basis of cancer. This course will examine the biological processes that are disrupted in cancer, such as DNA repair, cell cycle control and signaling pathways, as well as the science behind some current treatments. Prerequisites: general biology

    Course Code
    BIO 50S
  • Introduction to Biology

    Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.

    Course Code
    BIO 7S
  • Introduction to Biology Lab

    Optional laboratory to be taken with BIO7S. Introduction to basic biological laboratory techniques, including microscopy, identification of biomolecules, assaying enzyme activity, genetic manipulation of microorganisms, assaying the effects of gene mutation on protein function, and using PCR to genotype organisms.

    Course Code
    BIO 7SL
  • Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 201S)

    Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.

    Course Code
    CEE 101S
  • Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools (CEE 207S)

    Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.

    Course Code
    CEE 107S
  • Water Resources Management (CEE 265C)

    Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.

    Course Code
    CEE 165C
  • New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability (CEE 271F)

    Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.

    Course Code
    CEE 171F
  • Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 275P)

    Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.

    Course Code
    CEE 175P
  • Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 275S)

    Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.

    Course Code
    CEE 175S
  • Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 276G)

    Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.

    Course Code
    CEE 176G
  • Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

    The role of information technology (IT) in enabling mankind to improve the operations and sustainability of cities and communities. Review of what a "smarter" city of community might be, the role of IT in enabling them to become "smarter" (including what IT cannot achieve). Case studies on water, transportation, resilience, and open data & citizen sensing.

    Course Code
    CEE 177L
  • Smart Cities & Communities II (CEE 277M)

    Exploration of the informatics toolkit (internet of things, cloud, analytics, systems of engagement) for creating 'smarter' cities and communities. Case studies on energy, buildings, urban design, public services, and food complement the systems addressed in CEE 177L (for CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M). Panel of experts will frame opportunities and challenges.nCo-requisite: concurrent registration in CEE 177L for (CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M).

    Course Code
    CEE 177M
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    CEE 179S
  • Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab. (CEE 101S)

    Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.

    Course Code
    CEE 201S
  • Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools (CEE 107S)

    Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.

    Course Code
    CEE 207S
  • Water Resources Management (CEE 165C)

    Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.

    Course Code
    CEE 265C
  • New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability (CEE 171F)

    Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.

    Course Code
    CEE 271F
  • Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 175P)

    Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.

    Course Code
    CEE 275P
  • Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 175S)

    Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.

    Course Code
    CEE 275S
  • Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 176G)

    Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.

    Course Code
    CEE 276G
  • Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 177L)

    The role of information technology (IT) in enabling mankind to improve the operations and sustainability of cities and communities. Review of what a "smarter" city of community might be, the role of IT in enabling them to become "smarter" (including what IT cannot achieve). Case studies on water, transportation, resilience, and open data & citizen sensing.

    Course Code
    CEE 277L
  • Smart Cities & Communities II (CEE 177M)

    Exploration of the informatics toolkit (internet of things, cloud, analytics, systems of engagement) for creating 'smarter' cities and communities. Case studies on energy, buildings, urban design, public services, and food complement the systems addressed in CEE 177L (for CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M). Panel of experts will frame opportunities and challenges.nCo-requisite: concurrent registration in CEE 177L for (CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M).

    Course Code
    CEE 277M
  • Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability (CEE 179S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S)

    Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.

    Course Code
    CEE 279S
  • Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

    Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.

    Course Code
    CEE 70
  • Foundations of Water Science and Engineering

    No water, no life. Water shapes the earth. Its utilization, management, and control are critical concerns of all human societies. This class introduces basic scientific and engineering concepts and applies them to aquatic systems. We explore how water properties and processes act to sustain the planet and how human actions modify (for both good and ill) our water world.

    Course Code
    CEE 73
  • Structure and Reactivity

    First lecture class in summer organic series. Organic chemistry, functional groups, hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, thermochemistry, kinetics and chemical equilibria. Recitation. Prerequisite: 31 A, B or 31 X or an AP Chemistry score of 5.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1
  • Introduction to Organic Chemistry Lab

    Techniques for separation of compounds: distillation, crystallization, extraction and chromatographic procedures in the context of reactions learned in Chem 1. Use of GC instrumentation for the analysis of reactions. Lecture treats theory; lab provides practice. Prerequisite: Chem 33 or Chem 1 co-requisite.

    Course Code
    CHEM 1L
  • Organic Monofunctional Compounds

    Second lecture class in summer organic series. Organic chemistry of oxygen and nitrogen aliphatic compounds. Recitation. Prerequisite: Chem 33 or Chem 1.

    Course Code
    CHEM 2
  • Organic Chemistry Lab I

    Application of separation techniques in the context of reactions learned in Chem 2. Use of IR instrumentation for the analysis of reactions. Lecture treats theory; lab provides practice. Prerequisite: Chem 1L. Co-requisite: Chem 35 or Chem 2. Course equivalent in conjunction with Chem 3L: Chem 130

    Course Code
    CHEM 2L
  • Organic Polyfunctional Compounds

    Last lecture class in summer organic series. Aromatic compounds, polysaccharides, amino acids, proteins, natural products, dyes, purines, pyramidines, nucleic acids and polymers. Recitation. Prerequisite: Chem 35 or Chem 2. Course equivalent: Chem 131.

    Course Code
    CHEM 3
  • Chemical Principles I

    For students with moderate or no background in chemistry. Stoichiometry; periodicity; electronic structure and bonding; gases; enthalpy; phase behavior. Emphasis is on skills to address structural and quantitative chemical questions; lab provides practice. Recitation.

    Course Code
    CHEM 31A
  • Chemical Principles II

    Chemical equilibrium; acids and bases; oxidation and reduction reactions; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Lab. Prerequisite: 31A.

    Course Code
    CHEM 31B
  • Organic Chemistry Lab II

    Qualitative and analytical techniques applied to reactions learned in Chem 3. Use of NMR instrumentation for the analysis of reactions. Lecture treats theory; lab provides practice. Prerequisite: Chem 2L. Co-requisite: Chem 131 or Chem 3. Course equivalent in conjunction with Chem 2L: Chem 130

    Course Code
    CHEM 3L
  • Intensive Third-Year Modern Chinese

    Equivalent to 101,102,103 combined if taken together with the Beijing portion of the Summer Program. Five weeks at Stanford and four weeks at Peking University. Prerequisite: 23 or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHINLANG 105
  • Intensive Second-Year Modern Chinese

    Equivalent to 21,22,23 combined if taken together with the Beijing portion of the Summer Program. Five weeks at Stanford and four weeks at Peking University. Prerequisite: 3 or equivalent.

    Course Code
    CHINLANG 25
  • Intensive First-Year Modern Chinese

    Equivalent to 1,2,3 combined if taken together with the Beijing portion of the Summer Program. Five weeks at Stanford and four weeks at Peking University.

    Course Code
    CHINLANG 5
  • Greek and Latin Roots of English

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 14
  • Greek Mythology

    (Formerly CLASSGEN 18.) The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 31
  • Intensive Beginning Latin

    (Formerly CLASSLAT 10/210) Equivalent to a year of beginning Latin (three quarters; CLASSICS 1L, 2: and 3L), this course is designed to teach the fundamentals of the Latin language in eight weeks. We will focus primarily on acquiring the basics of Latin grammar, morphology, and vocabulary and developing basic reading skills. At the end of the course, students should be able to read easy Latin prose and poetry. We will be using Wheelock's Latin textbook and meeting three hours a day, four days a week. Grades will depend on class participation and on performance in weekly quizzes and in a final written exam. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. CLASSICS 4L fulfills the University language requirement.

    Course Code
    CLASSICS 4L
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (ENGR 155A)

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 4 or 5, or Calc AB with 5), or Math 41 and 42. Recommended: CME100.

    Course Code
    CME 102
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

    Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Course Code
    CME 106
  • Introduction to Scientific Computing (MATH 114)

    Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).nGraduate students should take it for 3 units and undergraduate students should take it for 4 units.

    Course Code
    CME 108
  • Psychology of Technology & Human-Technology Interaction

    Products of design surround us, and shape our lives. This course will explore the human relationship with technology from a psychological point of view, and probe how technology can be designed to work in concert with those who use it. To survey this vast space, the course will cover seminal readings in the areas of human factors, human-computer interaction, product design, and psychology. The course will also delve into the area of design, with a collaborative final project integrating design and psychology.

    Course Code
    COMM 109S
  • Social Media and Information Sharing

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and Myspace, are used as platforms to share information about oneself and others. These new media provide a variety of novel ways to share information (e.g. 'Like', 'Re-tweet', 'Share', etc.) and change the way individuals maintain and create relationships. The goal of this course is to understand emotional and motivational aspects of social media use and examine its potential consequences on individuals' opinions and preferences. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to theories in communication and psychology to have the foundation for understanding the mechanisms underlying media use. In the second half of the course, students will develop original research ideas and have group discussions to further explore and refine those ideas. At the end of the course, students will demonstrate their knowledge of psychological and emotional processes underlying media use and be able to evaluate the individual/social implications of social media use.

    Course Code
    COMM 110S
  • Media and Identities in the Globalizing Era

    Globalization, as an imperfect but veritable buzzword, has been used both popularly and academically to describe how the world has become increasingly interconnected in multiple ways. As the Canadian media scholar Marshall McLuhan's famous coined phrase--the "Global Village"-- suggests, the advancement of media technology revolutionizes the ways human beings connect and communicate with one another. By the word "globalizing" (in the title), the course construes trends of globalization both as on-going and deepening processes, and as an ensemble of powerful cultural, economic and social forces productively shaping our lived experiences. With the booming circulation of media/cultural products worldwide and the surging mobility of populations across boundaries, new questions arise: to what extent is the globalization of media production and consumption molded in the Western, especially American, culture? How do non-Western audience consume, interpret and appropriate American products? How do transnational migrants/diaspora negotiate their identities in relation to media representations? What role do new media and digital technology play in the deepening of the globalization processes?nnThrough a critical/cultural examination of the relevant literature and cases, the course helps students better understand topics and issues related to media and identities in the globalizing era. The first half of the course will concentrate on the globalization/localization of media production, the transnational media flows and cultural consumption. The interlocking economic, cultural and political factors that drive these processes are unpacked. The latter half of the course will be devoted to issues about cultural identities, migration and diaspora as well as media representation in multicultural societies. Throughout the course, the roles of both old and new media will be studied in the transnational and global contexts.

    Course Code
    COMM 114S

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